Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The irrespirable gas left in a coal-mine after an explosion of fire-damp (which see). It consists chiefly of carbonic-acid gas and nitrogen.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • The horrible, sickening after-damp was tearing my heart up through my dry throat.

    And Judas Iscariot Together with other evangelistic addresses

  • I had re-ascended to a higher level, I nearly fainted before I could retire from the commencement of a region of after-damp, where there had been an explosion, the bodies lying all hairless, devastated, and grotesque.

    The Purple Cloud

  • The bombardment slackens, and ends in a cloud of smoke that still echoes the crashes, in a quivering and burning after-damp.

    Under Fire: the story of a squad

  • There was choking after-damp below, noxious vapors, to breathe which was to die; there was the chance of crushing masses falling from the shaken galleries -- and yet these men left their companions one by one and ranged themselves, without saying a word, at the Curate's side.

    That Lass O' Lowrie's 1877

  • There was choking after-damp below, deadly noxious vapours, to breathe which was to die; there was the chance of crushing masses falling from the shaken galleries – and yet these men left their companions one by one and ranged themselves, without saying a word, at the curate's side.

    That Lass o' Lowrie's: A Lancashire Story

  • The match struck or the opened lamp set fire to the gas, when there was an awful explosion, and after that the terrible dangers of the after-damp, that fearful foul air which no man could breathe for long and live.

    Patience Wins War in the Works

  • The blast did not reach the shaft as in the former case; the unfortunate persons in the pit having been suffocated by the after-damp.

    Lives of the Engineers The Locomotive. George and Robert Stephenson

  • This danger proceeds from fire-damp, as one unlucky stroke of the pick may bring forth a stream of carbureted hydrogen gas, inexplosive of itself, but if mixed with eight times its bulk of air, more dangerous than gunpowder, and which, if by chance it comes in contact with the flame of a candle, is sure to explode, and certain death is the result -- not always from the explosion itself, but from the after-damp or carbonic acid gas which follows it.

    Lectures on Popular and Scientific Subjects

Comments

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  • if we are feeling like doing something very silly and dumb we could all breathe the afterdamp and see who lasts longest ;D

    December 10, 2012