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Examples

  • And I'm glad she found a use for alaia flower, I'll have to keep experimenting with my little bottle of it, can't figure out how to use it, it's just so weird....

    DSH Perfumes Part Two: Scents In Living Color

  • Making an alaia involves little more than a jigsaw, a hand planer, sandpaper and the right piece of wood.

    NYT > Home Page

  • My surfcraft that day was an alaia (pronounced ah-LIE-ah), a replica of the thin, round-nosed, square-tailed boards ridden in pre-20th-century Hawaii.

    NYT > Home Page

  • REVIVING AN ART Chad Marshall rides a wave on his alaia surfboard in Venice, Calif.

    NYT > Home Page

  • Richard Kenvin, a former pro surfer from San Diego, credits the alaia with giving him

    NYT > Home Page

  • Also, love it or hate it, the alaia craze for traditional boards that's currently infecting surfers everywhere reaches new and jaw-dropping heights in the film.

    independent.com stories

  • Making an alaia involves little more than a jigsaw, a hand planer, sandpaper and the right piece of wood.

    NYT > Home Page

  • Richard Kenvin, a former pro surfer from San Diego, credits the alaia with giving him

    NYT > Home Page

  • Look & Sea: A Little Experimentation Never Hurt Nobody and even more alaia-madness. these are some guys who are experimenting with various different forms of wooden finless shapes. some of the longest and thickest boards i've ever seen. beautiful rides in this video.

    Quality Peoples

  • The jazz duo The Mattson 2, whose music is featured in the film, will perform live at the screening, and a hand-shaped alaia surfboard will be raffled off at the event.

    Vineyard Gazette - Top Stories

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  • “My surfcraft that day was an alaia (pronounced ah-LIE-ah), a replica of the thin, round-nosed, square-tailed boards ridden in pre-20th-century Hawaii. The originals were 7 to 12 feet long, generally made of koa wood and could weigh up to 100 pounds. They resemble nothing so much as antique ironing boards, but their most distinctive feature compared with modern equipment is that they are finless.”

    The New York Times, Ancient Surfboard Style Is Finding New Devotees, by Jamie Brisick, December 4, 2009

    December 4, 2009