Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Same as alcavala.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • But the most egregious part of all this government largesse, at least to the citizens of Spain, was the so-called alcabala, which was a 10 percent excise tax on the transfer of all property, including food.

    Broke

  • Property taxes, said to have increased 30 per cent, ruined farmers, and the "alcabala," or tax on commodities bought and sold, was increased until merchants went out of business, and many an industrial establishment closed its doors rather than pay the taxes.

    A Political and Social History of Modern Europe V.1.

  • Here and there may be seen a little redoubt, with a battery of guns in it; but only on revolutionary occasions -- the wall, so far as defence goes, more concerning the smuggler than the soldier; and less contraband from abroad than infringement of certain regulations of home commerce -- chief of them the tax called "alcabala," corresponding to the _octroi_ of

    The Free Lances A Romance of the Mexican Valley

  • To the keen and vivid representations of Viglius, who repeatedly exhibited all that was oppressive and all that was impossible in the tax, he answered simply that it was nothing more nor less than the Spanish "alcabala," and that he derived 50,000 ducats yearly from its imposition in his own city of

    PG Edition of Netherlands series — Complete

  • To the keen and vivid representations of Viglius, who repeatedly exhibited all that was oppressive and all that was impossible in the tax, he answered simply that it was nothing more nor less than the Spanish "alcabala," and that he derived 50,000 ducats yearly from its imposition in his own city of

    The Rise of the Dutch Republic — Volume 16: 1569-70

  • To the keen and vivid representations of Viglius, who repeatedly exhibited all that was oppressive and all that was impossible in the tax, he answered simply that it was nothing more nor less than the Spanish "alcabala," and that he derived 50,000 ducats yearly from its imposition in his own city of

    The Rise of the Dutch Republic — Complete (1566-74)

  • To the keen and vivid representations of Viglius, who repeatedly exhibited all that was oppressive and all that was impossible in the tax, he answered simply that it was nothing more nor less than the Spanish "alcabala," and that he derived 50,000 ducats yearly from its imposition in his own city of

    The Rise of the Dutch Republic — Complete (1555-84)

  • The alcabala, an excessive tax on sales, was also suppressed.

    Simon Bolivar, the Liberator

  • Moreover, the 10 per cent tax on all sales -- the alcabala

    A Political and Social History of Modern Europe V.1.

  • The alcabala, an excessive tax on sales, was also suppressed.

    Simon Bolivar the Liberator

Comments

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  • "Royal taxes--including the alcabala (a sales tax), the averia (a tax that paid for Philip's fleet system), and the almojarifazgo (a duty on imports and exports)--amounted to as much as 25 percent of cochineal's import value, and the Crown collected additional sales taxes each time the dyestuff was resold in Spain."

    Amy Butler Greenfield, A Perfect Red: Empire, Espionage, and the Quest for the Color of Desire (New York: Harper Collins, 2005), 90.

    October 5, 2017