Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun See argol.
  • A ludicrous corruption of Latin ergo, therefore.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun Crude tartar. See argol.
  • noun (Zoöl.) A species of wild sheep (Ovis ammon, or Ovis argali), remarkable for its large horns. It inhabits the mountains of Siberia and central Asia.
  • adverb A ludicrous corruption of the Latin word ergo, therefore.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adverb thus, therefore
  • noun crude tartar.
  • noun An argali (kind of sheep).

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun wild sheep of semidesert regions in central Asia

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

A corruption of the Latin ergō ("therefore, thus").

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

A corruption of the Latin ergō ("therefore, thus").

Examples

  • In the olden time philosophers had whiskers, and soldiers none -- Scipio himself was shaven -- Hannibal thought his one eye handsome enough without a beard; but Adrian, the emperor, wore a beard (having warts on his chin, which neither the Empress Sabina nor even the courtiers could abide) -- Turenne had whiskers, Marlborough none -- Buonaparte is unwhiskered, the Regent whiskered; "'argal'" greatness of mind and whiskers may or may not go together; but certainly the different occurrences, since the growth of the last mentioned, go further in behalf of whiskers than the anathema of Anselm did

    Byron's Poetical Works, Volume 1

  • I especially enjoyed the week of archaic conjunctions from late November: argal sobeit whencesoever albeit forwhy

    Archive 2008-12-01

  • I especially enjoyed the week of archaic conjunctions from late November: argal sobeit whencesoever albeit forwhy

    Conjunction Junction

  • Thy father loved me for my lack of officiousness, argal, to serve thee is a religious duty incumbent on me.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Next day this hospital case turns up, and because the description of its author, given by more or less unobservant persons, fits the person you saw, _argal_, you jump to the conclusion that the three are one!

    Master of His Fate

  • From Fort Kearney to Fort Laramie, almost the only fuel to be obtained is the dung of buffalo and oxen, called, in the vocabulary of the region, "chips," -- the _argal_ of the Tartar deserts.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 03, No. 17, March, 1859

  • Our poet, he said, was the grandest output of the Teutonic mind; nine-tenths of the Teutonic mind was German-argal,

    New York Times, Current History, Vol 1, Issue 1 From the Beginning to March, 1915 With Index

  • They give every token of hating their neighbors consumedly; _argal_, they are going to be madly enamored of them.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 06, No. 38, December, 1860

  • Here lies the water; good: here stands the man; good: if the man go to this water, and drown himself, it is, will he, nill he, he goes; mark you that? but if the water come to him, and drown him, he drowns not himself: argal, he that is not guilty of his own death shortens not his own life.

    Act V. Scene I. Hamlet, Prince of Denmark

  • I like thy wit well, in good faith; the gallows does well, but how does it well? it does well to those that do ill; now thou dost ill to say the gallows is built stronger than the church: argal, the gallows may do well to thee.

    Act V. Scene I. Hamlet, Prince of Denmark

Comments

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  • Sheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeep!!!!!!!

    December 15, 2008

  • Wild ones.

    December 15, 2008

  • (adv) corruption of ergo, used to suggest absurd reasoning

    January 3, 2009