Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A bearer of armor for a knight; a squire.
  • n. A person entitled to bear heraldic arms.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A person entitled to bear a coat of arms.
  • n. A squire carrying the armour of a knight.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Formerly, an armor bearer, as of a knight, an esquire who bore his shield and rendered other services. In later use, one next in degree to a knight, and entitled to armorial bearings. The term is now superseded by esquire.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An armor-bearer to a knight; a squire; the second in rank of the aspirants to chivalry or knighthood.
  • n. One who has a right to armorial bearings: formerly used after the proper name by a person possessing such right, but no higher title: thus, “John Bolton, armiger,” is nearly equivalent to “John Bolton, gentleman.” In Shakspere, armigero.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a squire carrying the armor of a knight
  • n. a nobleman entitled to bear heraldic arms

Etymologies

Medieval Latin, from Latin, arms-bearing : arma, arms; see arm2 + gerere, to carry.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin armiger ("carrying weapons or armour"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • July 1st, 2008 at 12: 29 am ein armiger bandit says: poker kostenlos im internet

    Think Progress » Iraqi Leaders Call On U.S. To Set Timetable

  • The armiger was a burly redheaded youth who had just turned nineteen, nearly as tall as his formidable master.

    Conqueror's Moon

  • On his burly sword-arm, each intrepid champion wore an "armiger," or ribbon of his colour.

    The Virginians

  • "armiger" twice; in 50 Edward III, and 1 and 2 Richard II he is called

    Chaucer's Official Life

  • Records, recognize no such classification as "vallettus hospicii Regis," pet the records certainly point to the existence of such a classification.] and later of course, "armiger" or "scutifer."

    Chaucer's Official Life

  • He had known Bolingbroke's dear mother, by corpus bones, and he hoped a little verse from Galfridus Chaucer armiger dilectus might actually be read by the King himself.

    A Complaint to His Purse

  • And the secondary villain, the rival armiger Hammer, was a hoot.

    A Casting We Will Go

  • Merchants cannot become armiger, armigers cannot become noble, and nobles could not aspire to the monarchy.

    Pathfinder

  • There with Barton I had stepped back into my oldest role as armiger heir of Mueller; I had spoken like a lord, and now without thinking I mounted a horse so I could travel like one.

    Enjoyment

  • She did laundry for her master and his armiger, no doubt, and neglected her own.

    Wildfire

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