Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Either of two small pitcher-shaped cartilages at the back of the larynx to which the vocal cords are attached.
  • noun A muscle connected to either of these cartilages.
  • noun Any of several small mucous glands located in front of these cartilages.
  • adjective Of or relating to these cartilages or an associated muscle or gland.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Ladle- or cup-shaped: in anatomy, applied to two small cartilages at the top of the larynx, and also to the muscles connected with these cartilages.
  • noun An arytenoid cartilage.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective (Anat.) Ladle-shaped; -- applied to two small cartilages of the larynx, and also to the glands, muscles, etc., connected with them. The cartilages are attached to the cricoid cartilage and connected with the vocal cords.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun anatomy Either of a pair of movable cartilages in the larynx that serve as posterior attachment points for the vocal folds; a muscle attached to this cartilage, or a gland located near it.
  • adjective Of, or relating to this cartilage, muscle or gland.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun either of two small cartilages at the back of the larynx to which the vocal folds are attached

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[New Latin arytaenoīdēs, from Greek arutainoeidēs, shaped like a ladle : arutaina, feminine variant of arutēr, ladle (from aruein, to draw water) + -oeidēs, -oid.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Greek ἀρύταινα (arytaina) "ladle" + εἶδος (eidos) "kind".

Examples

  • On the upper edge of the cricoid cartilage are perched a pair of very singular cartilages, pyramidal in shape, called the arytenoid, which are of great importance in the production of the voice.

    A Practical Physiology

  • When the scarring from subglottic stenosis is limited to the back part of the vocal cords (inter-arytenoid region), it is called posterior glottic stenosis.

    Subglottic Stenosis

  • Creaky voice also called laryngealisation, pulse phonation or, in singing, vocal fry or glottal fry, is a special kind of phonation in which the arytenoid cartilages in the larynx are drawn together; as a result, the vocal folds are compressed rather tightly, becoming relatively slack and compact, and forming a large, irregularly vibrating mass.

    Archive 2007-07-01

  • The arytenoid consists of two pyramid shaped cartilage that lie at the back of the larynz at the upper edge of the cricoid.

    The Respiratory System: Anatomy 101

  • Each arytenoid is movable on the cricoid and is connected with one end of a vocal cord.

    Physiology and Hygiene for Secondary Schools

  • The largest represents the thyroid cartilage, the next in size the cricoid, and the two smallest the arytenoid cartilages.

    Physiology and Hygiene for Secondary Schools

  • When sound is not being produced, the glottis is open and has a triangular form, due to the spreading apart of the arytenoid cartilages and the attached cords.

    Physiology and Hygiene for Secondary Schools

  • When in their natural position the arytenoid cartilages resemble somewhat the mouth of a pitcher, hence their name.

    A Practical Physiology

  • A special set of muscles draws the arytenoid cartilages toward each other, thereby bringing their edges very near and parallel to each other in the passage.

    Physiology and Hygiene for Secondary Schools

  • * The Vocal Cords* are formed by two narrow strips of tissue which, connecting with the thyroid cartilage in front and the arytenoid cartilages behind, lie in folds of the mucous membrane.

    Physiology and Hygiene for Secondary Schools

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