Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Requiring one or more specific substances for growth and metabolism that the parental organism was able to synthesize on its own. Used with respect to organisms, such as strains of bacteria, algae, or fungi, that can no longer synthesize certain growth factors because of mutational changes.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective biology Describing a strain of organism that requires a specific metabolic substance that the parent organism was able to synthesize by itself

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Greek auxein, to increase; see auxin + –trophic.]

Examples

  • Mutation rates can be increased to one mutational event in every 10e1 or 10e2 cells per generation for auxotrophic mutants, and one in 10e3 to 10e5 for the isolation of improved secondary metabolite producers.

    1 Upgrading Traditional Biotechnological Processes

  • For example the parasites are auxotrophic for tryptophan and arginine (12-14).

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  • B: The 15 strains from A were spotted onto the indicated plates, grown for 2-3 days at 30°C and subsequently analyzed for auxotrophic marker distribution.

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  • The 3xABF2+ strain is not auxotrophic for tryptophan and uracil.

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  • For example, the increased transcription of SNZ1 and SNO1 in wild type (ABF2+) cells was expected because expression of these genes is increased in strains auxotrophic for tryptophan and uracil, such as the wild-type (ABF2+) strain.

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  • (auxotrophic) mutant strains of Neurospora, and to show that each single deficiency produced was associated with the mutation of a single gene11.

    Edward Tatum - Nobel Lecture

  • usually involves read-through of nonsense alleles in auxotrophic markers, e.g. ade1-14 (UAG) or ade2-1 (UAA).

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