Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of beak.
  • verb Third-person singular simple present indicative form of beak.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Immediately he gave orders to some sea gulls to bring water in their beaks from a near-by island.

    The Quaint and Curious Quest of Johnny Longfoot, the Shoe King's Son

  • Many of the jays carried acorns in their beaks, which is also in line with the guide books.

    Notes from the field: In praise of November

  • Many of the jays carried acorns in their beaks, which is also in line with the guide books.

    Lance Mannion:

  • The snap of their beaks was the only sharp noise in the hum of hot summers.

    A Year on the Wing

  • The seagulls in the animated movie Finding Nemo were still on message almost twenty-five years later: all that comes out of their beaks is the word “Mine.”

    Generation Me

  • The seagulls in the animated movie Finding Nemo were still on message almost twenty-five years later: all that comes out of their beaks is the word “Mine.”

    Generation Me

  • This was all that I had been able to make out, apart from a nose sharply outlined (a rare thing in a child) upon a thin face which recalled the beaks of baby vultures.

    The Captive

  • Almost every year, one or two land-birds are blown across the whole Atlantic Ocean, from North America to the western shores of Ireland and England; but seeds could be transported by these rare wanderers only by one means, namely, by dirt adhering to their feet or beaks, which is in itself a rare accident.

    XII. Geographical Distribution. Means of Dispersal

  • Guarantee the beaks are the reason the helmets are still on while on the migrant fleet - they haven't figured out how to model a beak talking and make it not look ridiculous.

    Joystiq [Xbox]

  • Guarantee the beaks are the reason the helmets are still on while on the migrant fleet - they haven't figured out how to model a beak talking and make it not look ridiculous.

    Joystiq

Comments

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  • British colloquialism for "chickens" kept by a poultryman as printed in The Countryman, Winter, 1956, p. 737.

    "H.K. Jones, who runs a special poultry section of his mixed farm near Southport-on-Severn, has been keeping hens in batteries for 20 years; now he has 6000 beaks and says it is the only way to make poultry pay."

    September 30, 2009