Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In heraldry, same as bevel, 5.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • B C D and E are spur gears, while G H and I are bevil gears, the cone surface on which the teeth lie being left blank, save at the edges where a tooth is in each case drawn in.

    Mechanical Drawing Self-Taught

  • Small bevil gears may also be represented by simple line shading; thus in Figure 247 the two bodies A and C would readily be understood to be a bevil gear and pinion.

    Mechanical Drawing Self-Taught

  • Figure 249 represents three bevil gears, the upper of which is line shaded, forming an excellent example for the student to copy.

    Mechanical Drawing Self-Taught

  • To save work in drawing bevil gear wheels, they are sometimes drawn in section or in outline only; thus in Figure 244 is shown a pair of bevil wheels shown in section, and in Figure 245 is a drawing of a part of an

    Mechanical Drawing Self-Taught

  • In drawing bevil gear wheels, the pitch line of each tooth on each wheel, and the surfaces of the points, as well as those at the bottom of the spaces, must all point to a centre, as E in Figure 241, which centre is where the axes of the shafts would meet.

    Mechanical Drawing Self-Taught

  • Figure 243 represents a drawing of one-half of a bevil gear, and an edge view projected from the same.

    Mechanical Drawing Self-Taught

  • Their houses are very ill built, the walls bevil, without one right angle in any apartment; and this defect arises from the contempt they bear to practical geometry, which they despise as vulgar and mechanic; those instructions they give being too refined for the intellects of their workmen, which occasions perpetual mistakes.

    Gulliver's Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World

  • Their houses are very ill built, the walls bevil, without one right angle in any apartment; and this defect arises from the contempt they bear to practical geometry, which they despise as vulgar and mechanic; those instructions they give being too refined for the intellects of their workmen, which occasions perpetual mistakes.

    Gulliver's Travels

  • Their houses are very ill built, the walls bevil, without one right angle in any apartment; and this defect arises from the contempt they bear to practical geometry, which they despise as vulgar and mechanic; those instructions they give being too refined for the intellects of their workmen, which occasions perpetual mistakes.

    Gulliver's Travels

  • Their houses are very ill built, the walls bevil, without one right angle in any apartment; and this defect arises from the contempt they bear to practical geometry, which they despise as vulgar and mechanic; those instructions they give being too refined for the intellects of their workmen, which occasions perpetual mistakes.

    Gulliver's Travels

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