Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A local name in the United States of the lake-herring or whitefish of Lake Michigan, Coregonus nigripinnis. See cisco.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Zoöl.) A species of whitefish (Coregonus nigripinnis) found in Lake Michigan.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun bluefin tuna, a number of types of tuna characterised by their blue fins.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun largest tuna; to 1500 pounds; of mostly temperate seas: feed in polar regions but breed in tropics
  • noun flesh of very large tuna

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • More people who frequently eat sushi know that bluefin is endangered, and may be gone within a few years at the rate we consume them, than any other type of seafood.

    2009 June - Sushi Day - Sushiday.com

  • More people who frequently eat sushi know that bluefin is endangered, and may be gone within a few years at the rate we consume them, than any other type of seafood.

    Sustainable Sushi Contest

  • First of all, selling a big bluefin is not as easy as catching one and running to the market.

    Would You Turn Commercial For The Right Price?

  • First of all, selling a big bluefin is not as easy as catching one and running to the market.

    Would You Turn Commercial For The Right Price?

  • I was really interested in finding out that more than just the bluefin is in danger.

    24 Hours

  • More people who frequently eat sushi know that bluefin is endangered, and may be gone within a few years at the rate we consume them, than any other type of seafood.

    Sushi Day » Protesting Bluefin Tuna » Print

  • Nobu promised to label bluefin as an endangered species on all of their menus, but subsequently changed tactics and cut off communications.

    Daniel Kessler: Save the Bluefin Tuna

  • The results show that some species of tuna, particularly those that restaurants value for their firmer flesh and appealing look - such as bluefin akami and all bigeye tuna - have higher mercury levels than other species typically found in grocery stores.

    KKTV - HomePage - Headlines

  • Some species of tuna, particularly those that restaurants value for their firmer flesh and appealing look - such as bluefin akami - have higher mercury levels than other species typically found in grocery stores.

    Livescience.com

  • The results show that some species of tuna, particularly those that restaurants value for their firmer flesh and appealing look - such as bluefin akami and all bigeye tuna - have higher mercury levels than other species typically found in grocery stores.

    Livescience.com

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