Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The reddish wood of certain tropical trees or shrubs in the pea family, especially a Brazilian tree Caesalpinia echinata, whose wood is used for violin bows and as a source of a red or purplish dye.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A Brazilian timber tree, Caesalpinia echinata, used primarily to make bows for string instruments.

Etymologies

Obsolete brazil, brazilwood (from Middle English brasile, from Old Spanish or Portuguese brasil, probably of East Indian origin) + wood1.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • Brazil, named for the brazilwood tree, which is named for Pt. brasa “ember” because the wood has a dark red color.

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  • Bama 1L says: 1. Brazil, named for the brazilwood tree, which is named for Pt. brasa “ember” because the wood has a dark red color.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » The Name of What Country

  • Other interesting, unique or rare plants in the region are "guachipelín blanco" Myrospermum frutescens, brazilwood (Haematoxylon brasiletto), "tamarindo de monte" Lysiloma divaricatum, Cedrela odorata and Bombacopsis quinatum.

    Central American dry forests

  • The choice of coloring materials was as critical here as it was in creating any other kind of color diagram: reference Le Blon recommended the use of a red lake made from cochineal or brazilwood, Prussian blue reference, and yellow berries (stil de grain), but the quality of the coloring materials was as important as their sources. 16 Black was made by combining the three colors and the paper support provided white.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • He wrote to the Spanish monarchs in 1493: “It is possible, with the name of the Holy Trinity, to sell all the slaves which it is possible to sell … Here there are so many of these slaves, and also brazilwood, that although they are living things they are as good as gold …”

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  • When we examine the silk patterns, we find, generally speaking, a similar degree of fastness among the various natural dyes, as with wool; in some instances the colors appear even faster, notice, for example, the catechu brown and the colors given by brazilwood and its allies, with iron mordant.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 810, July 11, 1891

  • It includes a padded gig bag and nice brazilwood mongolian horsehair bow with pearlized insets.

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  • Five hundred years ago, the Portuguese and other European invaders arrived and made their own settlements, at first to cut and export brazilwood and later to plant sugar cane they brought from their other colonies in Asia.

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