Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A bowl or cup of spiced wine and other ingredients formerly served with bride-cake at wedding-feasts. Also called bride-bowl.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The phrase "bride-cup" was also sometimes used of the bowl of spiced wine prepared at night for the bridal couple.

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 3 "Brescia" to "Bulgaria"

  • The _bride-cup_ was the bowl or loving-cup in which the bridegroom pledged the bride, and she him.

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 3 "Brescia" to "Bulgaria"

  • "The bride-cup was not yet drunk, Eric; therefore I have no blood-feud for Ospakar."

    Eric Brighteyes

  • All day Eric sat thus, looking on his dead love's face, till the hour came round when he and Gudruda had drunk the bride-cup.

    Eric Brighteyes

  • "The bride-cup is not yet drunk, lord," she answered.

    Eric Brighteyes

  • Then Groa started forward, and as she did so she seemed to stumble, so that for a moment her robe covered up the great bride-cup.

    Eric Brighteyes

  • The squire must needs have something of the old ceremonies observed on the occasion; so at the gate of the churchyard, several little girls of the village, dressed in white, were in readiness with baskets of flowers, which they strewed before the bride; and the butler bore before her the bride-cup, a great silver embossed bowl, one of the family reliques from the days of the hard drinkers.

    Bracebridge Hall

  • A bride-cup rested upon it, in which lay a sprig of gilded rosemary -- a relic or semblance of the ancient hymeneal torch.

    Traditions of Lancashire, Volume 2 (of 2)

  • The bride-cup was passed round, according to ancient usage, for the company to drink to a happy union; every one's feelings seemed to break forth from restraint.

    Bracebridge Hall, or The Humorists

  • The Squire must needs have something of the old ceremonies observed on the occasion; so, at the gate of the church-yard, several little girls of the village, dressed in white, were in readiness with baskets of flowers, which they strewed before the bride; and the butler bore before her the bride-cup, a great silver embossed bowl, one of the family relics from the days of the hard drinkers.

    Bracebridge Hall, or The Humorists

Comments

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  • The bowl or loving-cup in which the bridegroom pledged the bride, and she him.

    February 26, 2015