Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Second-person singular present simple form of bring

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

bring + -est

Examples

  • A word of Greek origin, supposed to signify a mountain or elevation; at least Innocent III so understood it, for in his work on the Mass (III, xxxiii), after speaking of the deacon ascending the ambo to read the Gospel, he quotes the following from Isaias (40: 9): "Get thee up upon a high mountain, thou that bringest good tidings to Sion: lift up thy voice with strength".

    Ambos, or Ambones

  • Do thy dancing there, and these women whom thou bringest with thee to share thy villainies I will either sell as slaves or make their hands cease from this noisy beating of drums, and set them to work at the loom as servants of my own.

    The Bacchantes

  • Thou shalt, eat no worse than thou bringest with thee.

    The Abbot

  • Thou bringest it for my lord; and wilt thou bring my lord worse than thou wilt eat thyself?

    The Abbot

  • And dost thou open thine eyes upon such an one, and bringest me into judgment with thee?

    Illustrations of The Book of Job

  • So, as soon as she came back bringing the pot, he said to her, “Did I tell thee I had aught to build, that thou bringest me earth and stones?”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Then he repeated to him all that had befallen him, since he last saw him, 257 whereat the Caliph laughed and his breast broadened and he said to Khalifah, “Ask of us what thou wilt, O thou to bringest to owners their own!”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • So (continued Jamil) when the night darkened and the hour of her coming arrived, and he awaiting her at the appointed tide, she delayed beyond her usual time, and I saw him go forth the door of the tent and opening his mouth, inhale the wafts of breeze that blew from her quarter, as if to snuff her perfume, and he repeated these two couplets: — Breeze of East who bringest me gentle air

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Replied she, “O Ibn Tahir, I gladly agree to this; for know that I never for one day took pleasure in him; so, if we separate, by Allah, I shall never regret him, and these two hundred thousand dirhams I give to thee as a reward for the glad tidings thou bringest me of my release from yonder dog of the Thakafites.”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Whenever thou bringest home folk in my absence, ask thy mother, and she will set before thee victual more than enough.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

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