Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A murmuring sound as of wind blowing through a forest.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • All is vastness; the clouds are piled up like giant rocks, and there is a "brool" over the sea that sounds like some presage of doom.

    National Review Online

  • 'brool' over the sea that sounds like some passage of doom.

    Dracula

  • All vastness, the clouds are piled up like giant rocks, and there is a ‘brool’ over the sea that sounds like some passage of doom.

    Dracula

  • Its _brool_ deepening, the Parrott stirred, shot forward abruptly.

    The Lone Wolf A Melodrama

  • There was the brool of war in the valley of Howpaslet.

    Bog-Myrtle and Peat Tales Chiefly of Galloway Gathered from the Years 1889 to 1895

  • It resembled the brool of lions heard afar by seafaring men upon some savage shore on a still night.

    The Coming of Cuculain

  • List to the brool of that royal forest-voice; sorrowful, low; fast swelling to a roar!

    The French Revolution

  • While I read "at once" to mean "all at the same time" you obviously read it as "immediately." so while your follow up made little sense to me since it was redundant in the manner in which I read the thread starter's comment, it was quite sensible in the manner in which you read it. therefore, I dug you back up. brool story co.

    Original Signal - Transmitting Digg

Comments

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  • All vastness, the clouds are piled up like giant rocks, and there is a 'brool' over the sea that sounds like some passage of doom. Dark figures are on the beach here and there, sometimes half shrouded in the mist, and seem 'men like trees walking'. The fishing boats are racing for home, and rise and dip in the ground swell as they sweep into the harbour, bending to the scuppers. - Dracula

    March 8, 2009

  • (A low roar; a deep murmur or humming.)

    July 31, 2007