Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A closed four-wheeled carriage with an open driver's seat in front.
  • noun An automobile with an open driver's seat.
  • noun An electrically powered automobile resembling a coupé.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A four-wheeled close carriage, with one or two horses, and adapted to carry either two or four persons.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A light, enclosed carriage, with seats inside for two or four, and the fore wheels so arranged as to turn short.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A four-wheeled horse-drawn carriage, designed in 1839. It had an open seat for the driver in front of the closed cabin for two or four passengers.
  • noun An automobile, a sedan without a roof over the driver's seat.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a sedan that has no roof over the driver's seat
  • noun light carriage; pulled by a single horse

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[After Henry Peter Brougham, First Baron Brougham and Vaux (1778–1868), Scottish-born jurist.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Named from Henry Peter, Lord Brougham (1778–1868), who either invented or popularized the vehicle.

Examples

  • Will you come out with me now – my brougham will be at the door directly – and I'll take you to a confectioner and let you choose for yourself?

    The Boys and I: A Child's Story for Children

  • The brougham was a token of harmony, of the fine conditions papa would this time offer: he had usually come for her in a hansom, with a four-wheeler behind for the boxes.

    What Maisie Knew

  • I am not the first doctor who has coined his brougham at night.

    A Simpleton

  • He smokes almost incessantly … It is now no uncommon thing to see a man in evening dress smoking in a brougham with a lady on their way to opera, theatre, or dinner engagement.

    Smoking Etiquette | Edwardian Promenade

  • I stopped the carriage, got out, and, after a few minutes 'conversation, persuaded two of the public women to get into the brougham with me.

    Chapter 7: The Bishop's Vision

  • I was in my brougham, driving through the streets.

    Chapter 7: The Bishop's Vision

  • Though I wailed and screamed, kicked and punched, they separated us, throwing me into the brougham carriage, which took off at once for police headquarters.

    The Curse of the Wendigo

  • We followed him to a brougham carriage waiting at the curb.

    The Curse of the Wendigo

  • Though I wailed and screamed, kicked and punched, they separated us, throwing me into the brougham carriage, which took off at once for police headquarters.

    The Curse of the Wendigo

  • We followed him to a brougham carriage waiting at the curb.

    The Curse of the Wendigo

Comments

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  • Hackney cars, cabs, delivery waggons, mail-vans, private broughams, aerated mineral water floats with rattling crates of bottles, rattled, lolled, horsedrawn, rapidly.

    Joyce, Ulysses, 7

    January 2, 2007

  • Usage on barouche.

    October 22, 2008

  • "A little farther up Fifth Avenue, Beaufort appeared on his doorstep, darkly projected against a blaze of light, descended to his private brougham, and rolled away to a mysterious and probably unmentionable destination."

    - Edith Wharton, 'The Age of Innocence'.

    September 19, 2009

  • Verb: to be transported by such a carriage. Tenses:broughamed, broughammed, broughamming, broughaming, broughams.

    December 25, 2017