Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A loud argument or dispute.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See brulyie.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • ‘I wasna comparing them,’ quoth Evan, ‘nor was I speaking about his being weel-favoured; but only that Mr. Waverley looks clean-made and deliver, and like a proper lad o’ his quarters, that will not cry barley in a brulzie.

    Waverley

  • The fact is, we were within five minutes of getting a wheen Stewart dirks in our doublets, and if there was no brulzie on foot we were even yet as good as lost on

    John Splendid The Tale of a Poor Gentleman, and the Little Wars of Lorn

  • The horses of Ogilvie -- who himself fell in the brulzie -- chased the

    John Splendid The Tale of a Poor Gentleman, and the Little Wars of Lorn

  • ` ` I wasna comparing them, '' quoth Evan, ` ` nor was I speaking about his being weel-favoured; but only that Mr. Waverley looks clean made and deliver, and like a proper lad of his quarters, that will not cry barley in a brulzie.

    The Waverley

  • On the whole, I am glad of this brulzie, as far as I am concerned; people will not dare talk of me as an object of pity -- no more

    The Journal of Sir Walter Scott From the Original Manuscript at Abbotsford

  • 'I wasna comparing them,' quoth Evan, 'nor was I speaking about his being weel-favoured; but only that Mr. Waverley looks clean-made and deliver, and like a proper lad o' his quarters, that will not cry barley in a brulzie.

    Waverley

  • DELIVER, and like a proper lad of his quarters, that will not cry barley in a brulzie, And, indeed, he's gleg aneuch at the broadsword and target, I hae played wi 'him mysell at Glennaquoich, and sae has Vich

    Waverley: or, 'Tis sixty years since

  • 'I wasna comparing them,' quoth Evan, 'nor was I speaking about his being weel-favoured; but only that Mr. Waverley looks clean - made and deliver, and like a proper lad o' his quarters, that will not cry barley in a brulzie.

    Waverley — Volume 2

  • Beyond your personal encouragement (and a Chiefs aye a consoling influence on the field, I'll never deny), there's little you could do here that cannot, with your pardon, be fairly well done by Sir Donald and myself, and Elrigmore here, who have made what you might call a trade of tulzie and brulzie. "

    John Splendid The Tale of a Poor Gentleman, and the Little Wars of Lorn

Comments

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  • Compare imbroglio, which as it happens is dictionary.com's word of the day:

    Imbroglio derives from Italian, from Old Italian imbrogliare, "to tangle, to confuse," from in-, "in" + brogliare, "to mix, to stir." It is related to embroil, "to entangle in conflict or argument."

    April 25, 2009

  • I fake umbrage at the concept of "bear-meal"! Cornmeal should do just fine, thank you very much!

    April 25, 2009

  • Brulzie or brulyie, a disturbance, a commotion, a quarrel. This word seems to be the root of the English brawl, broil, embroil, and embroilment, and the French embrouiller ; all derivable from the Gaelic bruill, to crush, to beat, to fight, to thrash.

    Bannocks o' bear-meal, bannocks o' barley !

    Wha' in a brulzie will first cry a parley?

    Never the lads wi' the bannocks o' barley ;

    Here's to the Highlandman's bannocks o' barley !

    Johnson's "Musical Museum"

    April 25, 2009