Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The state of being brutal or a brute.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun obsolete Brutality.
  • noun Insensibility.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The state or quality of being brute.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From brute +‎ -ness

Examples

  • This gives us a way of understanding how nominalists can plausibly use an appeal to bruteness to respond to the One Over Many argument.

    Platonism in Metaphysics

  • But it is the bruteness not the fuzziness that does the philosophical work.

    The Problem of the Many

  • The emphasis being on “man”, not “boy”, with all the courseness and bruteness that “man” represents to young adolescents on the cusp of puberty.

    Language around trans, how it works, how it doesn’t…

  • The immobility or bruteness of nature, is the absence of spirit; to pure spirit, it is fluid, it is volatile, it is obedient.

    Nature

  • The immobility, or bruteness, of Nature is the absence of spirit.

    The World's Greatest Books — Volume 13 — Religion and Philosophy

  • Some share may also have been contributed by the Platonic notion of the "grossness" or "bruteness" of tangible matter, -- a notion which has survived in Christian theology, and which educated men of the present day have by no means universally outgrown.

    The Unseen World, and Other Essays

  • Some share may also have been contributed by the Platonic notion of the "grossness" or "bruteness" of tangible matter, -- a notion which has survived in Christian theology, and which educated men of the present day have by no means universally outgrown.

    The Unseen World and Other Essays

  • He seemed to have become in a measure aware of the bruteness of the life he had hitherto led: he must have had a glimpse of something better.

    Donal Grant, by George MacDonald

  • The immobility or bruteness of nature, is the absence of spirit; to pure spirit, it is fluid, it is volatile, it is obedient.

    Nature: Addresses and Lectures (1849)

  • Through the bruteness and toughness of matter, a subtle spirit bends all things to its own will.

    Essays — First Series

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.