Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of buckboard.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He also complains about the 6000 buckboards for the colonels, thousands of saddles for the cavalry, and hundreds of airplane engines that were never used in the war.

    Mamas Don't Let your Babies grow up to be Soldiers!

  • From miles around, folks rode into Canadian on horseback and in creaking buckboards.

    THE AMERICAN WEST

  • And yes, Susan, our friends abroad do seem to think we're still riding around in buckboards.

    Speaking of Bryan ...

  • Westmoreland County, did he feel once more identified with his surroundings; at the station he saw a star he knew, and a cold moon bright over Chesapeake Bay; he heard the rasping wheels of buckboards turning, the lovely fatuous voices, the sound of sluggish primeval rivers flowing softly under soft Indian names.

    Tender is the Night

  • Already the outskirts of town were crowded with buckboards and gigs and carts, anchored like odd boats in a sea of salt grass.

    The Lightkeeper

  • Four or five generations ago, they said, the city had still been quite heavily populated and reasonably civilized, although the residents drove wagons and buckboards along the wide boulevards the Great Old Ones had constructed for their fabulous horseless vehicles.

    The Waste Lands

  • Two of the flat-bed mountain dwarf wag - ons were standing side-by-side, their buckboards pointed toward Flint; he saw no guards.

    Flint the King

  • When they rode into Blue Moon, the street was bulging with carriages and buckboards and the high-boxed, heavy-wheeled grain wagons.

    Stands a Calder Man

  • Its dusty street still had wooden walks and hitching posts for horses and buckboards, and most of the businesses were clustered around the one saloon.

    Denver

  • To these buckboards (which is a buggy with a board behind for luggage), or to any of the carriages, there are no wings to protect one from the mud, so that we always came in bespattered all over, a great trial to our clothes.

    A Lady's Life on a Farm in Manitoba

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