Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Archaic form of bulimia.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as bulimia.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • First, as for the word bulimy, it was agreed upon by all to denote a great and public famine, especially among us who use the Aeolic dialect, putting [Greek omitted] for [Greek omitted].

    Essays and Miscellanies

  • Therefore in my year there was a great concourse of people present at the sacrifice; and, after all the rites and ceremonies of the sacrifice were over, when we had seated ourselves again at the table, there was an inquiry made first of all into the signification of the word bulimy, then into the meaning of the words which are repeated when the servant is turned out of doors.

    Essays and Miscellanies

  • These things seemed to be reasonably well urged; and yet it seemed that much might be said for the contrary opinion, and that it was possible enough to maintain that bulimy ariseth not from condensation but rarefication of the stomach.

    Essays and Miscellanies

  • Now that bulimy is not hunger but a faintness, is manifest from all laboring beasts, which are seized with it very often through the smell of dry figs and apples; for a smell does not cause any want of food, but rather a pain and agitation in the stomach.

    Essays and Miscellanies

  • Here it comes to pass, that men troubled with this bulimy, when they are ready to starve with hunger, if they eat never so little meat, are presently refreshed.

    Essays and Miscellanies

  • Therefore as things that have a good smell recall the spirits of those that are faint, so bread affects those that are almost overcome with a bulimy; not that they have any need of food (for the least piece of it restores them their strength), but the bread calls back their vigor and languishing spirits.

    Essays and Miscellanies

  • But after we began to inquire after the cause of this disease, the first thing that puzzled us was to find out the reason why bulimy seizes upon those that travel in the snow.

    Essays and Miscellanies

  • Asses and horses are frequently troubled with bulimy, especially when they are laden with dry figs and apples; and, which is yet more strange, of all things that are eaten, bread chiefly refreshes not only men but beasts; so that, by taking a little quantity of bread, they regain their strength and go forward on their journey.

    Essays and Miscellanies

  • After all were silent, I (who had observed that dull fellows and those of a less piercing judgment were satisfied with and did acquiesce in the reasons the ancients gave for bulimy, but to men of ingenuity and industry they only pointed out the way to a more clear discovery of the truth of the business) mentioned

    Essays and Miscellanies

  • And when we see that a bulimy happens where there is no hunger, we may conclude that at that time the body is rather in a fluid than condensed state.

    Essays and Miscellanies

Comments

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  • Extreme hunger. (from Phrontistery)

    May 23, 2008