Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. An edible, gelatinous, greenish substance lying beneath the upper shell of a turtle.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The edible greenish material found underneath the upper half of a turtle's carapace (shell).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A part of a turtle which is next to the upper shell. It contains a fatty and gelatinous substance of a dull greenish tinge, much esteemed as a delicacy in preparations of turtle.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In cookery, that part of a turtle which belongs to the upper shield, consisting of a fatty gelatinous substance of a dull-greenish color. Also spelled callipash.

Etymologies

Possibly alteration of Spanish carapacho, carapace.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
French carapace, Spanish carapacho. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • He would show them the pools under the Mansion House where these creatures luxuriate while awaiting their doom; he would indicate the areas beneath the shell from some of which is extracted the calipash and from some the calipee; he might even induce the Most Worshipful

    Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 156, January 29, 1919

  • Dobbin helped him to it; for the lady of the house, before whom the tureen was placed, was so ignorant of the contents, that she was going to help Mr. Sedley without bestowing upon him either calipash or calipee.

    XXVI. Between London and Chatham

  • Even the celebrated Jew himself, when well filled with calipash and calipee, goes contentedly home to tell his money, and expects no more pleasure from his throat during the next twenty-four hours.

    The Works of Henry Fielding, Volume Six: Miscellanies

  • I was remarking that sangaree and calipash, mangoes and guava jelly, dispose the heart to love, and so they do.

    Charles O'Malley — Volume 1

  • The accommodation to fat citizens, and western _gourmands_, would be excellent, the very height of luxury and refinement -- inhaling the salubrious breeze one moment, and gurgling down the glutinous calipash the next; no ~277~~exactions of impudent waiters, or imposing landlords, or complaints of dying from hunger, or choking from the want of time to masticate; but every wish gratified and every sense employed.

    The English Spy An Original Work Characteristic, Satirical, And Humorous. Comprising Scenes And Sketches In Every Rank Of Society, Being Portraits Drawn From The Life

  • The tortise — as the alderman of Bristol, well learned in eating, knows by much experience — besides the delicious calipash and calipee, contains many different kinds of food; nor can the learned reader be ignorant, that in human nature, though here collected under one general name, is such prodigious variety, that a cook will have sooner gone through all the several species of animal and vegetable food in the world, than an author will be able to exhaust so extensive a subject.

    The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling

  • The tortoise—as the alderman of Bristol, well learned in eating, knows by much experience—besides the delicious calipash and calipee, contains many different kinds of food; nor can the learned reader be ignorant, that in human nature, though here collected under one general name, is such prodigious variety, that a cook will have sooner gone through all the several species of animal and vegetable food in the world, than an author will be able to exhaust so extensive a subject.

    I. Introduction to the Work, or Bill of Fare to the Feast. Book I

  • The tortoise -- as the alderman of Bristol, well learned in eating, knows by much experience -- besides the delicious calipash and calipee, contains many different kinds of food; nor can the learned reader be ignorant, that in human nature, though here collected under one general name, is such prodigious variety, that a cook will have sooner gone through all the several species of animal and vegetable food in the world, than an author will be able to exhaust so extensive a subject.

    History of Tom Jones, a Foundling

Comments

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  • George pooh-poohed the wine and bullied the waiters royally, and Jos gobbled the turtle with immense satisfaction. Dobbin helped him to it; for the lady of the house, before whom the tureen was placed, was so ignorant of the contents, that she was going to help Mr. Sedley without bestowing upon him either calipash or calipee.

    - Thackeray, Vanity Fair, ch. 26

    November 21, 2008