Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Simple past tense and past participle of capture.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The Perfect Passive Participle is often equivalent to a coördinate clause; as, -- urbem captam dīruit, _he captured and destroyed the city_ (lit. _he destroyed the city captured_).

    New Latin Grammar

  • a participle; as, -- urbe captā, Aenēās fūgit, _when the city had been captured, Aeneas fled_ (lit. _the city having been captured_).

    New Latin Grammar

  • I felt the term captured the essence of good parenting rather nicely.

    Parenting by the Book

  • To the Middle Dutch maken, French-speakers had added their telltale suffix -age, and the rest of the word captured how people pronounced that mix of borrowed verb and native ending.

    The English Is Coming!

  • The state agency supposed to oversee the drilling is what you call a captured agency: the people regulating energy companies are also supposed to promote gas permits.

    Mark Ruffalo: Lessons from Dimock, PA: Calling for a Moratorium on Natural Gas Drilling in New York

  • This term captured the crux of Sino-U.S. ties, said Niu Xinchun, vice director of the Center for American Studies at the China Institute of Contemporary International Relations.

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  • Yet the Pyongyang that Yu captured is one that is ready to celebrate, and this year marked not just the anniversary but also the named succession of Kim Jong Un, Kim Jong Il's youngest son.

    North Korean Workers' Party 65th Anniversary Celebration (PHOTOS)

  • Losing the moral advantage of the justness of our cause, of being just and strict with our principles in how we treat those we have captured is frighteningly incompetent stupidity.

    Discourse.net: Valuable Resource: A Torture Timeline

  • Details about actions and sensation are captured from the text and integrated with personal knowledge from past experiences.

    Boing Boing

  • The name captured me at first until its origin was explained to me; Hawke as in to Hawke up plegm, and Wind, as in to pas wind , better than Flobfart i suppose.

    In praise of … Lemmy | Editorial

Comments

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  • Railroad telegraphers' shorthand meaning "emigrant car(s)". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013