Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A light vessel or proa used by the people of Borneo, etc., and by the Dutch in the East Indies.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A light vessel or proa used by the people of Borneo, etc., and by the Dutch in the East Indies.

Etymologies

Malay kurakura. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Some of the audience, who were friends of Galvan, and interested in the caracore, ran to the mariners, who had brought the Father, and demanded of them, if they knew any certain news of this tragical adventure?

    The Works of John Dryden

  • The caracore of Xavier, after having been in danger of perishing many times, was at length saved, and recovered the port of Ternate by a kind of miracle: as for that of Galvan, it was not known what became of her, and the news concerning her was only brought by an evident revelation.

    The Works of John Dryden

  • These things being thus ordered, and the caracore, winch was to carry him to Amboyna, in readiness, it was in his thoughts to depart by night, in the most secret manner that he could, not to sadden the inhabitants, who could not hear of his going from them without a sensible affliction.

    The Works of John Dryden

  • The caracore of Xavier, after having been in danger of perishing many times, was at length saved, and recovered the port of Ternate by a kind of miracle: as for that of

    The works of John Dryden, $c now first collected in eighteen volumes. $p Volume 16

Comments

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  • "Caracores, are light vessels, used by the natives of Borneo and the islands adjacent, and by the Dutch as guarda-costas in those latitudes. They are high at each end, and chiefly navigated with paddles, to use which, they sit both within and without board, on narrow platforms of reeds, supported by bars rigged out across the vessel, and one at the outer end on each side, which serve as balances to prevent its upset. By placing three or four ranks of rowers on the platform of reeds outside, and some within, they can multiply their number so as to produce a very great velocity...."
    Falconer's New Universal Dictionary of the Marine (1816), 74–75

    October 14, 2008