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Etymologies

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Examples

  • As it chanced, a large Spanish carak named 'Las Cinque Llagas,' or 'The

    Montezuma's Daughter

  • Now on the morrow of my visit to Marina, the Captain Diaz came to see me and told me that a friend of his was in command of a carak which was due to sail from the port of Vera Cruz for Cadiz within ten days, and that this friend was willing to give me a passage if I wished to leave

    Montezuma's Daughter

  • I presented my letters of recommendation to the commander of the carak, who gave me passage without question, I laying in a stock of food for the journey.

    Montezuma's Daughter

  • Just then the carak gave a lurch before she sank, and, seeing that everything was over, I called to the priest to follow me, and springing into the sea I swam for the second boat, which, laden with some shrieking women, had drifted loose in the confusion.

    Montezuma's Daughter

  • I thought it marvellous that I should thus have escaped thrice from great perils within the space of a few days, first from the sinking carak, then from pestilence and starvation in the bold of the slave-ship, and now, if only for a while, from the cruel jaws of the sharks.

    Montezuma's Daughter

  • A great carak goes on this voyage every year, and brings from thence about 600,000 crusadoes: and all this silver of Japan, and

    A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels — Volume 07

  • But I must allow that the carak was as well provided for defence as any ship I have seen; and perhaps the Portuguese were encouraged by our slackness, as they plied our men from behind barricades, where they were out of danger from our shot.

    A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels — Volume 07

  • Thus much may suffice for our dangerous conflict with that unfortunate carak.

    A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels — Volume 07

  • In the morning, being very near the shore, our men could perceive the carak close to the land, and the Portuguese using their utmost endeavour to convey whatever they could from her on shore.

    A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels — Volume 07

  • The Sampson went aboard on the bow of the carak, but had not room enough, as our quarter lay on the bow of the Exchange, and our bow on that of the carak.

    A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels — Volume 07

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