Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Alternative spelling of caviar.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. salted roe of sturgeon or other large fish; usually served as an hors d'oeuvre

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Real caviare is obtained from the sturgeon - true or false?

    The Friday Brain-teaser from Credo Reference

  • The best caviare is said to be obtained in the Caspian.

    Glimpses of Life and Manners in Persia

  • The spontaneous bounty of nature appears to have bestowed the harvests of Ukraine, the produce of a rude and savage husbandry; and the endless exportation of salt fish and caviare is annually renewed by the enormous sturgeons that are caught at the mouth of the Don or Tanais, in their last station of the rich mud and shallow water of the Maeotis.

    The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

  • "We call caviare the bits blacked out in our newspapers and periodicals."

    The Crown of Life

  • Perhaps trout would take caviare, which is not forbidden by the law of the land.

    Introduction to the Compleat Angler

  • The first thing that an American does on his arrival in St. Petersburg is to scan the foreign newspapers in the hotels eagerly for traces of the censor's blot, -- _le masque noir_, "caviare," -- his idea being that at least one half of the page will be thus veiled from sight.

    Russian Rambles

  • To the general his novels must always be a kind of caviare; for they have no analogue in letters, but are the output of a mind and temper of singular originality.

    Views and Reviews Essays in appreciation

  • Now, listen: first, caviare on toast; then, clam bouillon; and creamed lobster; and tinned lamb chops with French peas -- you know, the peas that melt in one's mouth; and California asparagus with mayonnaise; and -- oh, I forgot to mention fried potatoes and cold pork and beans; and peach pie; and coffee, real coffee.

    CHAPTER XLIX

  • He sat with Yoko behind a large white desk, dipping crispbread into a tub of caviare.

    Jim Powell: First Job: Mailboy for The Beatles

  • It seems that the film industry is collapsing and people can't afford their champagne and caviare while the independent business can't make any films that are a success because of internet piracy.

    Filmstalker: Pirates produce Besson's new film

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