Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A long sleeveless vestment worn over the alb by a priest during services.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Eccles., a sleeveless vestment, originally circular in outline, but in medieval and modern use of an elliptical shape, or modified from this so as to be nearly rectangular, and provided with an aperture in the center through which to pass the head.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Eccl.) The outer vestment worn by the priest in saying Mass, consisting, in the Roman Catholic Church, of a broad, flat, back piece, and a narrower front piece, the two connected over the shoulders only. The back has usually a large cross, the front an upright bar or pillar, designed to be emblematical of Christ's sufferings. In the Greek Church the chasuble is a large round mantle.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The outermost liturgical vestment worn by clergy for celebrating Eucharist or Mass.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a long sleeveless vestment worn by a priest when celebrating Mass

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[French, from Old French, from Late Latin casubla, hooded garment, from *casupula, diminutive of casa, house.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Old French chesible, from late Latin casubla, an alteration of Latin casula ("little cottage, hooded cloak"), a diminutive of casa ("house").

Examples

  • Now conical chasubles are rare enough to see, all things considered, but the sight of a conical rose chasuble is virtually unheard of:

    A Rare Sight: A Conical Rose Chasuble

  • Right: Side detail visible of an 18th century chasuble from the monastery church of Santa Chiara, Naples.) (Centre: A chasuble from the church of the Gesu in Rome, made for Cardinal Farnese in the second half of the 16th century and based upon an earlier design of the artist Raphael.

    Roman Exhibition Showcases Significant and Historical Vestments

  • The ornament which the bishop is wearing above the chasuble is the rationale, an episcopal humeral, a counterpart of the pallium, and like it worn over the chasuble.

    The Mater Ter Admirabilis

  • In fact, there is thought that the chasuble is actually derived from what was originally a common form of Roman civil dress:

    Use, History and Development of the "Planeta Plicata" or Folded Chasuble

  • His chasuble was a full and heavy mantle in which red and white could be seen in transparency, and gleaming with jewels . . .

    Archive 2007-11-04

  • His chasuble was a full and heavy mantle in which red and white could be seen in transparency, and gleaming with jewels . . .

    Prophecy on the Rise of the Great Monarch

  • His chasuble was a full and heavy mantle in which red and white could be seen in transparency, and gleaming with jewels . . .

    The Great Monarch

  • His chasuble was a full and heavy mantle in which red and white could be seen in transparency, and gleaming with jewels . . .

    Archive 2007-08-05

  • The Cardinal afterwards changes his cope for a chasuble, which is purple as well as that of the subdeacon; but the deacon, as he is going to bless the Paschal candle [112], wears a white dalmatic.

    The Ceremonies of the Holy-Week at Rome

  • The tunicle became the customary vestment of the subdeacons; the chasuble was the vestment exclusively worn at the celebration of the Mass, as the pluvial, the liturgical caps, took its place at the other functions.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 15: Tournely-Zwirner

Comments

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  • "The red-bearded priest came forward. He handed Prisbek his stole and untied the strings of the chasuble that Prisbek had provided."

    - 'The Colour Of Blood', Brian Moore.

    January 3, 2008

  • Try as I might, I cannot get chasuble off my "words that make me laugh" list, and it's all Oscar Wilde's fault.

    March 11, 2008

  • Shape of Devotion

    a sleeveless vestment, originally

    circular in outline,

    but in medieval and modern use of an

    elliptical shape,

    or modified from this so as to be

    nearly rectangular,

    and provided with an

    aperture in the

    center

    through which to pass the head.

    It is worn so as to

    fall in front

    and

    at the back

    of the wearer to an

    equal

    or nearly equal distance,

    showing only one of its

    halves

    at a time.

    June 5, 2012