Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A tree producing cherries. See cherry.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • For others, the sanctimonious cherry-tree killer invented by Mason Weems comes to mind, a miniature version of the wise and solemn man he would become.

    George Washington’s First War

  • Just back from picking some meat from the cherry-tree, this was a real katharsis.

    Catachresis and the amusing, awful and artificial cathedral

  • For others, the sanctimonious cherry-tree killer invented by Mason Weems comes to mind, a miniature version of the wise and solemn man he would become.

    George Washington’s First War

  • For others, the sanctimonious cherry-tree killer invented by Mason Weems comes to mind, a miniature version of the wise and solemn man he would become.

    George Washington’s First War

  • For others, the sanctimonious cherry-tree killer invented by Mason Weems comes to mind, a miniature version of the wise and solemn man he would become.

    George Washington’s First War

  • The Presidents 'Day holiday was officially established in 1885 to honor George Washington, the apocryphal cherry-tree chopper, Revolutionary general, and first U.S. president whose visage graces the ever-iconic U.S. one dollar bill.

    Bill Chameides: Save Those Presidents

  • The Presidents 'Day holiday was officially established in 1885 to honor George Washington, the apocryphal cherry-tree chopper, Revolutionary general, and first U.S. president whose visage graces the ever-iconic U.S. one dollar bill.

    Save Those Presidents

  • Admonitions against lying are as old as Western civilization itself, but the Ninth Commandment was applied to the presidency by the first presidential biographer — a parson named Mason Locke Weems, who not only launched the cult of the president-as-truth-teller but did so retroactively with that famous, but unverifiable, cherry-tree story.

    Untruth and Consequences

  • Admonitions against lying are as old as Western civilization itself, but the Ninth Commandment was applied to the presidency by the first presidential biographer — a parson named Mason Locke Weems, who not only launched the cult of the president-as-truth-teller but did so retroactively with that famous, but unverifiable, cherry-tree story.

    Untruth and Consequences

  • Admonitions against lying are as old as Western civilization itself, but the Ninth Commandment was applied to the presidency by the first presidential biographer — a parson named Mason Locke Weems, who not only launched the cult of the president-as-truth-teller but did so retroactively with that famous, but unverifiable, cherry-tree story.

    Untruth and Consequences

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