Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun One who undertook the expense of providing the chorus in ancient Greek drama.
  • noun The leader of a group or movement.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In Greek antiquity, the leader or superintendent of a chorus; the superintendent of a theatrical representation at Athens.
  • noun Hence, figuratively, any conductor or leader, as of an entertainment or festival.
  • noun [ML.] Eccles., an officer who superintends the musical details of divine service. The name and office are still retained in the University of Oxford.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Gr. Antiq.) A chorus leader; esp. one who provided at his own expense and under his own supervision one of the choruses for the musical contents at Athens.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun historical, Ancient Greece A chorus leader, especially one who provided at his own expense and under his own supervision one of the choruses for the musical contests at Athens.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun (ancient Greece) leader of a group or festival; leader of a chorus

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Latin chorāgus, from Greek khorēgos, khorāgos : khoros, chorus; see gher- in Indo-European roots + agein, to lead; see ag- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Latin choragus, from Ancient Greek χορός ("chorus") + ἄγω ("I lead").

Examples

Comments

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  • ...it dawned on him that he might be called upon to act as choragus himself.

    - Malcolm Lowry, October Ferry to Gabriola

    July 30, 2008

  • Choragus and Coryphæus, according to OED, are two posts in the Department of Music at Oxford carrying "modest stipends". They appear to be sinecures. Choregus is an alternative; the spelling varies according to the Greek dialect from which the word is transcribed.

    April 15, 2012