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  • Cimaruta (Chee-Mah-Roo-Tah): Also called Mallocchio, Spring of Rue, Jettatura, Witch’s Charm, and Cima di Ruta. A very ancient protective charm dating back to 4500-3000 B.C.E., depicting a bird, fish, serpent, and spiral.

    Steeped in history and witchcraft, a version of the Cimaruta, or Italian Witch Charm, was mostly used in ancient Italy. “Cimaruta,�? means “spring of rue�? and the branches of the charm are the branches of that most sacred plant. From the rue branches at each end is a sprout; out of the sprout comes forth many occult symbols, such as the key, dagger, blossom, and moon. All Cimaruta are different according to region of origin, and the symbols vary. Some of the variations include: a rose, a hand holding a wand or sword, a flaming heart, a crescent moon, a snake, an owl, a plumed Medieval helmet, a Vervain flower blossom, a dolphin, a cock, and a crow.

    The Cimaruta was always made of silver, and was traditionally double-sided. The Cimaruta was often placed upon the breasts of infants, as a protection (evoking the goddess Diana whom ancient Roman women gave offeings to for an easier childbirth). Before it became popular among the common people, it was used by witches as a sign of membership in the Witch-cult. The Cimaruta charm was used by the Society of Diana, the Old Religion of the Witches, in the past centuries, and many Italian witches still wear them. Because most Cimaruta charms are fairly large - some almost 4 inches across - not only can it be worn around the neck but it can also be hung above any door, on the wall, and near any sacred altar space. However, Cimaruta are rare and can be very difficult to find. A few can be found on Internet shops and in some physical shops that carry witchcraft supplies.

    _Wikipedia

    February 11, 2008