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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Seawards one looked over a goods-siding, where there stood a few wagons of cockle-shells and a cinderpath esplanade on to a vast plain of mud.

    The Judge

  • They slackened speed before they came to the wharf, which just here by the station jutted out in a grey bastion surmounted by the minatory finger of a derrick, and some of them climbed out and put round baskets full of shining fish upon their heads, and, walking struttingly to brake their heavy boots on the slippery mud, followed a wet track up to the cinderpath.

    The Judge

  • He broke into a run and, running quicker and quicker, ran across the cinderpath and reached the third line playground, panting.

    A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

  • In the moonlight she saw Braddock and Cockatoo go down along the cinderpath to the jetty near the Fort.

    The Green Mummy

  • "'Andy,' says I, as we strayed through the smoke along the cinderpath they call Smithfield Street, 'had you figured out how we are going to get acquainted with these coke kings and pig iron squeezers?

    Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine

  • "'Andy,' says I, as we strayed through the smoke along the cinderpath they call Smithfield street, 'had you figured out how we are going to get acquainted with these coke kings and pig iron squeezers?

    The Gentle Grafter

Comments

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  • He used to walk round the cinderpath with a long, loping, clumping-footed stride (he was a slight spare man, physically active even in his late fifties, still playing real tennis) head down, hair, tie, sweaters, papers all flowing , a figure that caught everyone's eyes.

    —from C. P. Snow's 1967 foreword to G. H. Hardy's A Mathematician's Apology

    "a footpath, or running-track, laid with cinders"—OED

    Sic to space between 'flowing' and comma: there are proof-reading errors in every book however oft reprinted. I also think it requires a comma after the closing bracket, though arguably you could do without and it would be read in an integrated way: 'He walked round the cinderpath with a loping stride head down' is possible, I suppose.

    December 30, 2008