Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Same as chive.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A small bulbous garden-plant, Allium Schœnoprasum, of the same genus as the leek and onion, cultivated as a pot-herb. Also chive, chire-garlic.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. perennial having hollow cylindrical leaves used for seasoning

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Is it that I am so weak as to believe, like a child, that I come here in that dress to rec – cive that boy only to decide a little bet, a wager?

    Bleak House

  • Usually shorter grains will cive you a creamier pudding.

    Rice Pudding (with uncooked rice) | Baking Bites

  • Analogous ideas were expressed by Matteo Palmieri in his work Della vita civile (ca. 1440) and Bartolommeo de 'Sacchi in De optimo cive.

    RENAISSANCE HUMANISM

  • Leviathan was an artificial contrivance constructed to satisfy the requirements of the component elements of society — “men as if but even now sprung out of the earth, and suddenly, like mushrooms, come to full maturity, without all kind of engagement to each other” (De cive [1642], VIII, 1).

    TYPES OF INDIVIDUALISM

  • His De cive contains a sharp criticism of Aristotle's idea of man as a social creature.

    Dictionary of the History of Ideas

  • Hobbes treated despotic government in The Ele - ments of Law (first version, 1640), in De cive (1642), and in the Leviathan (1651), but he did not adopt

    Dictionary of the History of Ideas

  • Latin treatise, De cive, he repeated the distinction between states originating in dominium paternum et despoticum, which he called naturale, and another type of dominium established by institution, called politicum created by artifice.

    Dictionary of the History of Ideas

  • Nam esse pro cive qui civis non sit rectum est non licere; quam legem tulerunt sapientissimi consules Crassus et Scaevola (95 B.C.); usu vero urbis prohibere peregrinos sane inhumanum est.

    A History of Rome During the Later Republic and Early Principate

  • [228] Especially in his Leviathan, 1651, and in his De cive. 1647; comp.

    Christian Ethics. Volume I.���History of Ethics.

  • Is it that I am so weak as to believe, like a child, that I come here in that dress to rec-cive that boy only to decide a little bet, a wager?

    Bleak House

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