Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Present participle of civilise.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Or Quezacotl the Feathered Serpent (hey, more seraphim?) who is identified as a civilising force of light and good against the forces of darkness and chaos.

    You Go, Greydanus, or, O'Brien and the Dragon

  • Obviously, to John Vorster it would have been preferable that this great honour should have gone to one of the apartheid architects presumably for their so-called civilising efforts of the backward natives.

    Address at the 40th anniversary of Inkosi Albert Luthuli's passing away

  • He much enjoyed listening to the accounts given by travellers of the scenes, animals and plants and native life they had seen, and deplored the so-called civilising of the natives, which, in his opinion, generally meant their exploitation by Europeans, leading to their deterioration and extermination.

    Alfred Russel Wallace Letters and Reminiscences

  • "Admitting all that," said Shelton, "what I hate is the humbug with which we pride ourselves on benefiting the whole world by our so-called civilising methods."

    The Island Pharisees

  • "Admitting all that," said Shelton, "what I hate is the humbug with which we pride ourselves on benefiting the whole world by our so-called civilising methods."

    Complete Project Gutenberg John Galsworthy Works

  • The period since the year 1870 has for the most part witnessed the operation of the last and the least romantic of these so-called civilising efforts.

    The Development of the European Nations, 1870-1914 (5th ed.)

  • Pinker's account suggests that what the great cultural historian Norbert Elias called the "civilising process" was a long, arduous struggle whose long-term outcome was never assured.

    The Guardian World News

  • Running in parallel came what social anthropologist Geoffrey Gorer called the civilising of the British character.

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  • Running in parallel came what social anthropologist Geoffrey Gorer called the civilising of the British character.

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  • Running in parallel came what social anthropologist Geoffrey Gorer called the civilising of the British character.

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