commonplace book love

commonplace book

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A personal journal in which quotable passages, literary excerpts, and comments are written.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A book in which things especially to be remembered or referred to are recorded methodically.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun a personal notebook or journal in which memorabilia, quotations etc were written

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a notebook in which you enter memorabilia

Etymologies

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Examples

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Comments

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  • "Commonplace books did not become common until paper became readily available and literacy fairly widespread, roughly in 16th-century England. With the invention of the printing press and the accumulation of books, the serious reader realized that the sea of knowledge was incommensurable. A commonplace book would allow him to salvage at least a few pearls.

    Commonplace books have been willed to heirs, not only as family keepsakes, but as manuals of instruction; when John Bunyan married in 1649, the sum total of his wife’s dowry was two commonplace books."

    - Ian Hunter, 'My Commonplace Books', nationalpost.com, 20 August 2008.

    September 1, 2008

  • Some commonplace books were published. Ben Johnson's Timber (1640), and W.H. Auden's A Certain World (1971) are notable English language examples.

    September 23, 2009