Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Meat, such as duck, that has been salted and then cooked and preserved in its own fat.
  • noun A condiment made by cooking seasoned fruit or vegetables, usually to a jamlike consistency.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A Middle English form of comfit.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun obsolete Same as comfit.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Any of various kinds of food that have been immersed in a substance for both flavor and preservation.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a piece of meat (especially a duck) cooked slowly in its own fat

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English confyt, from Old French confit, from Medieval Latin cōnfectum, from past participle of cōnficere, to prepare; see confect.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

French confit, p.p. of confire ("to preserve"), from Latin conficere.

Examples

  • These days the word confit is used loosely to describe just about anything cooked slowly and gently to a rich, succulent consistency: onions in olive oil, for example, or shrimp cooked and stored under clarified butter.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • These days the word confit is used loosely to describe just about anything cooked slowly and gently to a rich, succulent consistency: onions in olive oil, for example, or shrimp cooked and stored under clarified butter.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • In modern usage of the term confit, the connotations of immersion, impregnation, flavoring, and slow, deliberate preparation survive, while the idea of preservation—and the special flavors that develop over weeks and months—has faded away.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • In modern usage of the term confit, the connotations of immersion, impregnation, flavoring, and slow, deliberate preparation survive, while the idea of preservation—and the special flavors that develop over weeks and months—has faded away.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • Whether leftover roasted duck or store-bought or homemade confit is used, the green salsa, with the slight tartness of tomatillos, is a perfect foil for the rich flavor of duck.

    Duck Tacos: Tacos de Pato

  • Unfortunately it's a term that's currently being abused around the restaurant world, rather like the term confit which I've seen applied to tomatoes.

    Zucchini Velouté

  • The fingerling potatoes were called confit in the sides part of the menu, by which I assume they mean poached in oil, either way their waxy flesh had a sumptuous bite.

    Café Cluny, 421 saturatillian stars

  • The fingerling potatoes were called confit in the sides part of the menu, by which I assume they mean poached in oil, either way their waxy flesh had a sumptuous bite.

    Augieland:

  • The fingerling potatoes were called confit in the sides part of the menu, by which I assume they mean poached in oil, either way their waxy flesh had a sumptuous bite.

    Today in the Times

  • The fingerling potatoes were called confit in the sides part of the menu, by which I assume they mean poached in oil, either way their waxy flesh had a sumptuous bite.

    Café Cluny, 421 saturatillian stars: originally posted 11/08/06

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