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Examples

  • “Baker went straight back to France,” Page wrote to his son Arthur, “and our whole cooeperation began.”

    The Life and Letters of Walter H Page

  • The different countries and peoples and governments will not and cannot learn the lesson of federation and cooeperation so long as a large mass of their people have no voice and no knowledge except of their particular business.

    The Life and Letters of Walter H Page

  • But after Page's Plymouth speech the people of Great Britain looked forward with complete confidence to the cooeperation of the two countries and to the inevitable triumph of this cooeperation.

    The Life and Letters of Walter H Page

  • The British Government wished to send a distinguished commission to the United States, for two reasons: first, to show its appreciation of the stand which America had taken, and secondly, to discuss plans for cooeperation in the common task.

    The Life and Letters of Walter H Page

  • The sympathetic cooeperation and the moral force of every Allied

    The Life and Letters of Walter H Page

  • Mr. Balfour and his associates were working also on this problem in Washington; and, at the same time, Page and Admiral Sims and the British Admiralty were bending all their energies in London to obtain immediate cooeperation.

    The Life and Letters of Walter H Page

  • Plymouth Speech, inspires confidence in American cooeperation, II

    The Life and Letters of Walter H Page

  • Baker went straight back to France and our whole cooeperation began.

    The Life and Letters of Walter H Page

  • He had never concealed his belief that the destinies of mankind depended more upon the friendly cooeperation of the United States and Great Britain than upon any other single influence.

    The Life and Letters of Walter H Page

  • A foreign policy that would estrange the United States and perhaps even throw its support to Germany would not only lose the war to Great Britain, but it would be perhaps the blackest crime in history, for it would mean the collapse of that British-American cooeperation, and the destruction of those British-American ideals and institutions which are the greatest facts in the modern world.

    The Life and Letters of Walter H Page

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