Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Zoöl.) A South American rodent (Myopotamus coypus), allied to the beaver. It produces a valuable fur called nutria.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A large, crepuscular, semiaquatic rodent (Myocastor coypus) resembling a large rat, having bright orange-yellow incisors, native to South America, Europe, Asia and North America, valued for its fur in eastern Europe and central Asia and considered a pest elsewhere.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun aquatic South American rodent resembling a small beaver; bred for its fur

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[American Spanish coipo, coipú, from Mapuche koypu.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Spanish coipú, from Mapudungun koypu.

Examples

  • They are also known as coypu, Greek for mouse and beaver and the preferred designation of biologists.

    Into the Story

  • They are also known as coypu, Greek for mouse and beaver and the preferred designation of biologists.

    Into the Story

  • They are also known as coypu, Greek for mouse and beaver and the preferred designation of biologists.

    Into the Story

  • They are also known as coypu, Greek for mouse and beaver and the preferred designation of biologists.

    Into the Story

  • Otherwise known as the coypu, the nutria were introduced to south Louisiana in the 1930s to be raised for their fur.

    TREND HUNTER - The Latest Trends

  • Otherwise known as the coypu, the nutria were introduced to south Louisiana in the 1930s to be raised for their fur.

    TREND HUNTER - The Latest Trends

  • Otherwise known as the coypu, the nutria were introduced to south Louisiana in the 1930s to be raised for their fur.

    TREND HUNTER - The Latest Trends

  • Otherwise known as the coypu, the nutria were introduced to south Louisiana in the 1930s to be raised for their fur.

    TREND HUNTER - The Latest Trends

  • In most other places they're known as coypu, the name given them by the Arucanians, an indigenous people of south-central Chile and Argentina, the animal's native territory.

    Starbulletin Headlines

  • These sturdy immigrants threaten some of our 46 native ladybirds in the manner of the coypu and grey squirrel.

    John Godber swaps Hull for Wakefield

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • Cute word.

    December 12, 2018