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  • cslouch c*slouch verb.

    1. To slide into a piece of furniture without supportive posture; syn: slouch, slump. The old leather couch no longer supported Bob’s back so he had to cslouch while relaxing.


    Origin:
    circa 2012. Modern English. American English < From “couch” early 14c., from O.Fr. colchier, from L. collocare "to lay," from com- "together" + locare "to place" (see locate). Meaning "to put into words" is from 1529. Heraldic couchant is late 15c., from Fr. prp. and “slouch” 1515, "lazy man," variant of slouk (1570), perhaps from O.N. slokr "lazy fellow," and related to slack on thnotion of "sagging, drooping." Meaning "stooping of the head and shoulders" first recorded 1725. The verb meaning "walk with a slouch" is from 1754. Slouch hat first attested 1837. Source: dictionary.com.

    c*slouch*ful – adjective
    c*slouch*i*ly - adverb

    October 2, 2012