curiosity-shop love

curiosity-shop

Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A place where curiosities are sold or kept.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • We made several purchases at an Indian curiosity-shop, where we paid for the articles about six times their value, and meanwhile our driver took the opportunity of getting “summat warm,” which very nearly resulted in our getting something

    The Englishwoman in America

  • Scotch friend and I stepped ashore with the intention of visiting an Indian curiosity-shop.

    The Englishwoman in America

  • I say she died that night: and he — he, the heartless, the villain, the betrayer, — you saw him seated in yonder curiosity-shop, by yonder guillotine, with his scoundrelly head in his lap.

    Roundabout Papers

  • It was a jumble of tavern and curiosity-shop; and though there was nothing there remotely suggesting the cult of the Monkey, it is, of course, possible that some of its images or talismans were in such a place.

    The Complete Father Brown

  • It was a jumble of tavern and curiosity-shop; and though there was nothing there remotely suggesting the cult of the Monkey, it is, of course, possible that some of its images or talismans were in such a place.

    The Complete Father Brown

  • You will find there revolutionists like boorish Ribalta, who is ending in a curiosity-shop a life more eventful than the most eventful of the sixteenth century.

    The French Immortals Series — Complete

  • Therefore, it was not until I had been soothed with an excellent lunch, and the contents of a very long tumbler, that I felt strong enough to take an intelligent interest in the contents of the Maharana's curiosity-shop!

    A Holiday in the Happy Valley with Pen and Pencil

  • _, I may was well jot down two more odd sayings from the same old curiosity-shop: -- "As proud as old COLE's dog which took the wall of a dung-CART, and got CRUSHED by the wheel."

    Notes and Queries, Number 29, May 18, 1850

  • Rome, as you must some day, you will always harbor a small canker-worm of immitigable grief, that you did not purchase one stone you saw and thought too high-priced; and will pass thenceforward no curiosity-shop without looking in the windows a moment, in the hope of finding some gem strayed away into parts where no man knows its value.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 18, No. 108, October, 1866

  • What on earth can the most stay-at-home of British artists have to do with that out-of-the-way old curiosity-shop of the American continent?

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 15, No. 87, January, 1865

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