Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective cyanogenetic

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective capable of producing cyanide

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Both species belong to a group of plants that produce chemicals called cyanogenic glycosides, which break down to release poisonous cyanide gas if the leaves are crushed or chewed.

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  • Both species belong to a group of plants that produce chemicals called cyanogenic glycosides, which break down to release poisonous cyanide gas if the leaves are crushed or chewed.

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  • Both species belong to a group of plants that produce chemicals called cyanogenic glycosides, which break down to release poisonous cyanide gas if the leaves are crushed or chewed.

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  • Both species belong to a group of plants that produce chemicals called cyanogenic glycosides, which break down to release poisonous cyanide gas if the leaves are crushed or chewed.

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  • Compounds such as this that produce cyanide when broken down are called "cyanogenic" compounds.

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  • Though almost all research on lignans has centered on flaxseed lignans, there are concerns regarding the content of cyanogenic glycosides in flaxseeds and the potential for oxidation of ground flaxseed powder and flaxseed oil.

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  • These are Thiocynate, Isothiocynate & cyanogenic glucosides.

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  • Bitter taste in cassava roots correlates with cyanogenic glucoside.

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  • It contains cyanogenic glycosides and should not be taken during pregnancy.

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  • Although it's common practice in Mexico to use the leaves raw in agua fresca, a tea-like cold drink, chaya does contain cyanogenic glycosides, which are a source of cyanide poisoning, so it should not be eaten raw.

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