Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Hinduism, Buddhism Hierophany, theophany; being in the presence of the divine or holy (as a person or object).

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Sanskrit दर्शन (darśana, "vision"), from a root  (dṛś, "to see").

Examples

  • "Although originally a Hindu notion, the idea of darshan became an integral aspect of kingship throughout the subcontinent."

    BBC News | News Front Page | World Edition

  • "Although originally a Hindu notion, the idea of darshan became an integral aspect of kingship throughout the subcontinent."

    BBC News | News Front Page | World Edition

  • "Although originally a Hindu notion, the idea of darshan became an integral aspect of kingship throughout the subcontinent."

    BBC News | News Front Page | World Edition

  • She finished her 'darshan' and came out; and saw the man was walking in the corridor.

    When the great actor was mistook for a begger

  • As many as 13,000 pilgrims had 'darshan' of ice lingam of Lord Shiva at the cave shrine of

    Daily News & Analysis

  • MADURAI: The Constitutional scheme of things does not permit division of devotees visiting public temples on the basis of their economic affordability by extending a special 'darshan' for those who were prepared to pay a specified fee and a regular one for others, the Madras High Court Bench here has said.

    The Hindu - Front Page

  • Swaimadhopur district, after performing 'darshan' at Kamleshawar Mahadev temple in Indergarh,

    Daily News & Analysis

  • MADURAI: The Constitutional scheme of things does not permit division of devotees visiting public temples on the basis of their economic affordability by extending a special 'darshan' for those who were prepared to pay a specified fee and a regular one for others, the Madras High Court Bench here has said.

    The Hindu - Front Page

  • Pyarelal was overwhelmed with emotions and said that he wanted to come to Ujjain and was waiting for this glorious moment as he wanted to have the 'darshan' of Shri Mahakaleshwar.

    Gaea Times (by Simple Thoughts) Breaking News and incisive views 24/7

  • Keshav Rai, the President of Malwa Rangmanch Samiti took Pyarelal for the 'darshan' and also told the gathering that he wished the felicitation ceremonies of the leading Bollywood personalities will be done on a national level by the Malwa people.

    Gaea Times (by Simple Thoughts) Breaking News and incisive views 24/7

Comments

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  • I love Gretchen Rubin's The Happiness Project Blog, and a nice side affect of reading it (in addition to a daily attitude readjustment) is new vocabulary words! Gretchen loves words, and it shows.

    A couple of weeks I learned darshan -- a Sanskrit word meaning (my rough translation) "basking in the glow" (of a holy person, usually). Gretchen extends it to explain why people like being in the presence of celebrities.

    September 12, 2007

  • Ah, so there is a word for it.... :-)

    September 12, 2007

  • People often stare at me with eyebrows raised and their mouths agape. I've always described it as flat stupefaction, but this word sounds so much more refined. I guess I have a rather darshive personality.

    September 13, 2007

  • I wonder whether darshan is related to baraka in any way?

    September 13, 2007

  • Yes, uselessness. That's exactly what's been happening. You're just spectacularly darshive, is all. :-D

    September 14, 2007

  • While 'darshan' is often used to describe the act of seeing an idol in a temple ("I stood in the queue at Tirumala for two hours to have a darshan of the Lord"), the word is entirely secular in nature. As far as I know, it merely means 'the acting of seeing something'. Consequently, you have India's state-run television, 'doordarshan', ('the act of seeing, ie, vision, from afar').

    Of course, my understanding could be clouded by dialectal usage in modern Indian languages, something that may, or may not, reflect on its original Sanskrit roots.

    September 24, 2007