Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Eye dialect spelling of devil.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A dialectal (Scotch) form of devil.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I may be the deevil himsell for what ye ken; for he has power to come disguised like an angel of light; and besides he is a prime fiddler.

    Redgauntlet

  • And when my gudesire came forward, Sir Robert, or his ghaist, or the deevil in his likeness, said,

    Redgauntlet

  • “Here, ye auld doited deevil,” said Caleb, still exulting in his extrication from a dilemma which had seemed insurmountable;

    The Bride of Lammermoor

  • “The Almighty guide your course through the troubles of this wicked warld — and the muckle deevil blaw wind in your sails,” she added, in her natural tone, as the guests vanished from her miserable threshold.

    Saint Ronan's Well

  • George was heard vociferating, 3 “What the deevil, Mrs. Grimslees, the Captain is no in his bed? and a gentleman at our house has ordered a fowl and minced collops, and a bottle of sherry, and has sent to ask him to supper, to tell him all about the Abbey.”

    The Monastery

  • What deevil could he hae to say to Jeanie Deans, or to ony woman on earth, that he suld gang awa and get his neck raxed for her?

    The Heart of Mid-Lothian

  • “Ye may say that,” said Ratcliffe, with a sardonic smile; “and” (touching his nose) “a deevil amang the lasses.”

    The Heart of Mid-Lothian

  • “Stay there, and be hanged, then, for a donnard auld deevil!” said the other, and ran down the prison stair.

    The Heart of Mid-Lothian

  • And I hae as little doubt that the poor deevil Morris, whom he could gar believe onything, was egged on by him, and some of the Lowland gentry, to trepan me in the gate he tried to do.

    Rob Roy

  • Sae ae auld hirpling deevil of a potter behoved just to step in my way and offer me a pig, as he said, just to put my Scotch ointment in, and I gave him a push, as but natural, and the tottering deevil coupit ower amang his ain pigs, and damaged a score of them.

    The Fortunes of Nigel

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.