Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Scots The devil; Satan.
  • n. Scots A mischievous person; an imp.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Devil; -- spelt also deel.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The devil.
  • n. A wicked, mischievous, or troublesome fellow.
  • n. See dil-.

Etymologies

Scots, from Middle English dele, variant of devel; see devil.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • "But somehow 'deil' doesn't sound as bad as devil," argued Blanche.

    Hunter's Marjory A Story for Girls

  • 'Faither!' he cried, 'I said "deil" to-day; many's the time I said it, and

    Lay Morals

  • 'deil's in ye, Ailie; d'ye no see the stranger gentleman?'

    Guy Mannering, Or, the Astrologer — Complete

  • If we can agree on that then we can all stop playing deil-speed-the-liars with the wingnuts who think Obama has been foisted on the American people by the Comintern, or whatever repalced it.

    John Terry’s sacking as England captain tells us something interesting...

  • My gudesire was, by this time, far beyond the bounds of patience, and, while he and Laurie were at deil speed the liars, he was wanchancie aneugh to abuse

    Redgauntlet

  • ‘The deil a bit,’ answered the undaunted Peter Peebles; I mind ye weel, for ye lodged in my house the great year of Forty-five, for

    Redgauntlet

  • “What the deil, man,” said an old Highland servant belonging to the family, “can she no drink after her ain master without washing the cup and spilling the ale, and be tamned to her!”

    A Legend of Montrose

  • “Deil a fear — deil a fear; I will bring him in to the barrace myself,” said Norman, “assuredly.”

    The Fair Maid of Perth

  • You will find yourself a right welcome guest to Eachin, and the deil a man dares stir you within his bounds.

    The Fair Maid of Perth

  • He had, indeed, in a manner vowed that the deil should have him, if ever he put the print of his foot within its causeway again.

    The Bride of Lammermoor

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