Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective archaic morally blemished.
  • adjective (Religion) ritually unclean. Opposite of clean.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective impure; dirty
  • verb Simple past tense and past participle of defile.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective morally blemished; stained or impure

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The one who became defiled, _was defiled_, whether intentionally or not; GOD'S requirement was absolute, and where not fulfilled the vow was broken; the sin-offering had to be offered, and the service recommenced.

    Separation and Service or Thoughts on Numbers VI, VII.

  • As Kenneth spoke, I had something of an intellectual breakthrough, a glimpse of understanding about my own sexuality, and it all hinged on the word defiled.

    Wake Up, Sir!

  • Or tear their name defiled from Slavery's mournful page.

    Mosaics of Grecian History

  • He would not have her name defiled in the mouths of such men as drank his wine daily and nightly, and disputed the existence of any virtue in woman.

    The Golden Dog

  • Or tear their name defiled from Slavery's mournful page.

    Childe Harold's Pilgrimage

  • Or tear their name defiled from Slavery's mournful page.

    The Works of Lord Byron. Vol. 2

  • Or tear their name defiled from Slavery’s mournful page.

    Childe Harold's Pilgrimage

  • And when they saw some of his disciples eat bread with defiled, that is to say, with unwashen hands, they found fault.

    Mark 7.

  • And when they saw some of his disciples eat bread with defiled, that is to say, with unwashen, hands, they found fault.

    Jesus of Nazareth, A Biography, by John Mark

  • No homely Boston phrase defiled their anglicized lips, their great collars stood up under their chins in an ecstasy of stiffness, and their shirt - fronts bore two buttons, avoiding the antiquity of three and the vulgarity of one.

    An American Politician

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.