Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Tending to denounce.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Characterized by or containing a denunciation; minatory; accusing; threatening.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Relating to or implying denunciation; containing a public threat; comminatory.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. containing warning of punishment

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • You are treading the particular path of literary art unflinchingly and rightly, but are you really quite alien to the tendency which you call denunciatory literature?

    Leo Tolstoy: Childhood and Early Manhood

  • "Impossible!" was Mr. Hale's rejoinder, when I had read the item aloud; but the incident evidently weighed upon his mind, for late in the afternoon, with many epithets denunciatory of his foolishness, he asked me to acquaint the police with the affair.

    The Minions of Midas

  • JFK's surviving siblings -- save for Rosemary, who had been lobotomized on the orders of her father -- all signed a denunciatory op-ed article in the New York Times, drafted by Schlesinger, and titled: "Reckless Biography."

    Nigel Hamilton: The Kennedys

  • I haven't seen any denunciatory releases from the J Street crowd in D.C. which constantly berates Israel for not being more forthcoming with concessions to the Palestinians.

    Ed Koch: The Mufti of Jerusalem Calls For the Murder of Jews

  • The Narrative of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, By Himself, published in 1845, is another example I cited -- "passionate, demanding, denunciatory, self-analytical: 'autobiographies' now differed from people's 'memoirs,' as their authors challenged themselves and the world to be honest about their own lives."

    Nigel Hamilton: Bush and Memoirs

  • One could of course try to justify the duty-to-rescue/report laws primarily on retributive or denunciatory grounds, not pragmatic ones: Under this theory, those who failed to rescue or promptly report simply deserve punishment, even if such punishment may ultimately make other criminals harder tocatch.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Duties to Rescue (or Report) and the Anticooperative Effects of Law

  • The white knight (well, gray knight) was about to make one of those denunciatory revelations that grinds evil under the heel of justice.

    London Theater Journal: The Marathon Continues with an Oddly Tepid “Gaslight” - ArtsBeat Blog - NYTimes.com

  • Orwell's denunciatory fervor is almost counterproductive; readers may well feel sorry for the little chap whose hair color, nasal explosions, and accident of birth were none of his doing.

    Such, Such Was Eric Blair

  • One would hope, though, that more anti-war films would come out that are not based in broad-stroke cliches, where instead the drama comes from nuance, taking cue from some of the more startling investigations out today, such as Jeremy Scahil's, Naomi Klein's, and Greg Grandin's recent denunciatory pieces on the war.

    Karin Badt: A Conversation With Brian DePalma

  • This little advertisement, in circulation only since Sunday, has already prompted almost twenty vehemently denunciatory emails, none of which reflect a far-right, Evangelical Christian bias.

    Ellis Weiner: My Love Affair With Hate Mail

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