Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Any of various dark, granite-textured, crystalline rocks rich in plagioclase feldspar and having little quartz.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The name given by Haüy to a rock included among those varieties which had before that time been generally designated by the name greenstone.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Min.) An igneous, crystalline in structure, consisting essentially of a triclinic feldspar and hornblende. It includes part of what was called greenstone.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun geology A grey intrusive igneous rock composed mostly of plagioclase feldspar, biotite, hornblende and/or pyroxene.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a granular crystalline intrusive rock

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[French, from Greek diorizein, to distinguish : dia-, apart, between; see dia– + horizein, to divide, limit; see horizon.]

Examples

  • Besides stuffs and mats, the furniture comprised chairs, beds, stools, an enormous number of vases, some in coarse pottery for common use, others in choice stone such as diorite, granite, or rock crystal very finely worked, on the fragments of all of which may be read cut in outline the names and preamble of the Pharaoh to whom the object belonged.

    History Of Egypt, Chaldæa, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 1 (of 12)

  • Intrusive igneous rocks such as diorite, gabbro and granite solidify below the Earth's surface while extrusive igneous rocks such as basalt, obsidian and pumice solidify on or above the surface.

    The Brussels Journal - The Voice of Conservatism in Europe

  • Laws regulating financial interactions survive from as early as the eighteenth century BC, when King Hammurabi of Babylon had a number of them written in Mesopotamian stone, or rather rock, namely superhard diorite.

    The English Is Coming!

  • Laws regulating financial interactions survive from as early as the eighteenth century BC, when King Hammurabi of Babylon had a number of them written in Mesopotamian stone, or rather rock, namely superhard diorite.

    The English Is Coming!

  • Lava, quartz diorite and limestone formations are wondrous.

    Dwight Brown: Aruba: The Beach Is Just the Beginning...

  • The sketch pinned to the board refers to Cox's Osirisisis, which stands outside a Norman Foster building at Stockley Park business park near Heathrow and which is made from diorite from the eastern mountains of Egypt.

    A room of my own: Stephen Cox

  • Well, not exactly -- but that ancient litany of 282 laws, inscribed on diorite some 3,700 years ago, did enjoin the master craftsmen of Babylon to pass on their trade and treat their apprentices fairly.

    Lapham's Quarterly: Of Apprentices and Interns

  • Well, not exactly -- but that ancient litany of 282 laws, inscribed on diorite some 3,700 years ago, did enjoin the master craftsmen of Babylon to pass on their trade and treat their apprentices fairly.

    Lapham's Quarterly: Of Apprentices and Interns

  • The diorite block was so fragile that to keep it from chipping or cracking during installation it had to be set upon several blocks of ice and nudged gently into its foundation as the ice melted away.

    Colossus

  • The diorite block was so fragile that to keep it from chipping or cracking during installation it had to be set upon several blocks of ice and nudged gently into its foundation as the ice melted away.

    Colossus

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