Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A male fox.
  • n. The arctic fox, Vulpes lagopus, and especially the blue fox subspecies.
  • n. Any species of the genus Vulpes.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A male fox. See the Note under dog, n., 6.
  • n. The Arctic or blue fox; -- a name also applied to species of the genus Cynalopex.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A male fox.
  • n. A name of some small burrowing species of Vulpes, as the corsak, V. corsac, with reference to their resemblance to both the dog and the fox (which see).

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Captain did not know what were the running powers of a dog-fox in

    Ayala's Angel

  • It was a lovely dog-fox in its prime, with a handsome, thick, winter coat: a lovely golden-red colour, with grey as it passed to the belly, and belly all white, and a great full brush with a delicate black and grey and pure white tip.

    The Fox

  • What connection is there between a galley and dog-fox?

    The Knights

  • "Son of Aegeus, beware of the tricks of the dog-fox, he bites from the rear and rushes off at full speed; he is nothing but cunning and perfidy."

    The Knights

  • Why, then, does the oracle not say dog instead of dog-fox?

    The Knights

  • To this Sir Harry replied resentfully that the Captain did not know what were the running powers of a dog-fox in March.

    Ayala's Angel

  • It could have been an innocent sound enough, or if not innocent of murderous intent, at any rate natural, the distant voices of hunting owls, and the predatory bark of a dog-fox prowling his nocturnal barony.

    The Sanctuary Sparrow

  • I have smelled on the dews of night the dog-fox running to his earth, and lain down with a stone for pillow, where Night's Daughters hounded me from dream to dream.

    The Bull From The Sea

  • He yapped at his troops, sharp as a dog-fox, and they formed a hollow column, all stepping in line, a wonder to see.

    The King Must Die

  • "Son of Aegeus, [120] beware of the tricks of the dog-fox, [121] he bites from the rear and rushes off at full speed; he is nothing but cunning and perfidy."

    The Eleven Comedies, Volume 1

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