Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • In mech., acting or applying power in two directions; producing a double result.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Acting or operating in two directions or with both motions; producing a twofold result.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • With double-acting powder, some gas is released at room temperature when the powder is added to the batter or dough, but the majority of the gas is released in the heat of the oven.

    The Christmas Cookie Cookbook

  • Baking powder is available as single-acting baking powder and as double-acting baking powder.

    The Christmas Cookie Cookbook

  • It is no longer being made, so I used my standard baking powder, Rumford brand, which is double-acting.

    Like a lullaby

  • You probably have double-acting baking powder in your pantry.

    The Christmas Cookie Cookbook

  • With double-acting powder, some gas is released at room temperature when the powder is added to dough, but the majority of the gas is released when placed in the oven.

    The Christmas Cookie Club

  • Baking soda will do the same leavening, given sufficient acid to react with it, but I prefer double-acting baking powder, which contains its own acid, also releases gas when heated, and is a more consistent leavener.

    Ratio

  • With double-acting powder, some gas is released at room temperature when the powder is added to dough, but the majority of the gas is released when placed in the oven.

    The Christmas Cookie Club

  • With double-acting powder, some gas is released at room temperature when the powder is added to dough, but the majority of the gas is released when placed in the oven.

    The Christmas Cookie Club

  • Undaunted, de Jouffroy adapted James Watt's designs to build a parallel-motion, double-acting steam engine .

    July 15, 1783: Marquis Invents Steamboat, Misses Esteem Boat

  • I've also found baking powder, but it doesn't say "double-acting".

    When Necessity is the Mother of Invention

Comments

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