Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A small house or box, raised to a considerable height above the ground, and having compartments, in which domestic pigeons breed; a dove house.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A dovecote.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Peeping out, I saw that between me and the dovecot was a piece of bare cobbled ground, where no footmarks would show.

    The Thirty-Nine Steps

  • Peeping out, I saw that between me and the dovecot was a piece of bare cobbled ground, where no footmarks would show.

    The Adventure of the Bald Archaeologist

  • Peeping out, I saw that between me and the dovecot was a piece of bare cobbled ground, where no foot marks would allow.

    The Thirty-Nine Steps

  • Peeping out, I saw that between me and the dovecot was a piece of bare cobbled ground, where no footmarks would show.

    The Thirty-Nine Steps

  • His father and mother incidentally taught him as much as Mr. Ready: his love of painting and music was fostered, indirectly: and in the 'dovecot' bookshelf above the fireplace in his bedroom, were the precious volumes within whose sway and magic was his truest life.

    Life of Robert Browning

  • His father and mother incidentally taught him as much as Mr. Ready: his love of painting and music was fostered, indirectly: and in the 'dovecot' bookshelf above the fireplace in his bedroom, were the precious volumes within whose sway and magic was his truest life.

    Life of Robert Browning

  • In Hewelsfield churchyard further down the green lane, I squeezed inside the hollow of the thousand-year-old yew and looked up into the lantern of its twisted trunk, illuminated like the inside of a dovecot through the perforations where long-dead boughs once emerged.

    Wildwood

  • In Hewelsfield churchyard further down the green lane, I squeezed inside the hollow of the thousand-year-old yew and looked up into the lantern of its twisted trunk, illuminated like the inside of a dovecot through the perforations where long-dead boughs once emerged.

    Wildwood

  • The little watering-place has returned to its primitive obscurity; and lions and lionesses, with their several jackals, blue surtouts, and bluer stockings, fiddlers and dancers, painters and amateurs, authors and critics, dispersed like pigeons by the demolition of a dovecot, have sought other scenes of amusement and rehearsal, and have deserted ST.

    Saint Ronan's Well

  • Perchance, with a dovecot in the centre, and fowls peeking about — with fair elm trees, then, where discoloured chimney-stacks and gables are now — noisy, then, with rooks which have yielded to a different sort of rookery.

    Reprinted Pieces

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