Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of dowsing rod.

Etymologies

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Examples

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Comments

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  • Caught that too, did you? ;-)

    January 24, 2008

  • Yikes. Great link, reesetee. Poor thing is probably just lonely. But why doesn't it reassure me that the cama project is headed by a Dr. "Lulu" Skidmore?

    January 24, 2008

  • But apparently the little guy is a grump. Darn. Nothing like a miniature camel in a nasty mood kicking around your cubicle.

    January 24, 2008

  • Minature, um, camel fodder? What do ordinary camels eat for that matter? (And it turns out there really is something like a Shetland camel: see cama.)

    January 24, 2008

  • Haha! Now I'm going to imagine a Shetland camel in my cubicle. Asativum, you made my day. :-)

    What does a Shetland camel eat, do you think? Certainly not Cheez Wiz. Or wasabi peanut crunchies.

    January 24, 2008

  • Shetland camels?

    January 24, 2008

  • They'd never fit. You should see this place. It's the size of a postage stamp. And not even the big commemorative kinds, either.

    January 24, 2008

  • They'd make an interesting addition to your desktop adornment list, anyway.

    January 24, 2008

  • Hmph. I don't see them sitting on their camel butts for 10 hours a day.

    Not that I'd want to.

    January 24, 2008

  • Camels.

    January 24, 2008

  • Ah, your water cooler is also 1.5 miles away from your desk? Who designed these places, anyway?

    January 24, 2008

  • I could use some dowsing rods at my desk; beats always hiking over to the water cooler, anyway. ;-) See also: Derren Brown on Dowsing

    January 24, 2008

  • Have you found any underground goodies around your desk, Treeseed? ;-)

    January 23, 2008

  • Dowsing, sometimes called divining or water witching, refers to the practice of detecting hidden or buried water, metals, gemstones, or other such objects without the use of scientific apparatus. Dowsers generally make use of a Y- or L-shaped twig or rod (dowsing rods) to assist with detection, however some dowsers use other equipment or no equipment at all.

    The ones on my desk are brass L-shaped ones with small crystals on the handles and a loose-fitting sleeve over each handle that allows them to swivel freely in my hands.

    January 23, 2008