Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Feed for livestock, especially coarsely chopped hay or straw.
  • n. Raw material, as for artistic creation.
  • n. A consumable, often inferior item or resource that is in demand and usually abundant supply: romantic novels intended as fodder for the pulp fiction market.
  • transitive v. To feed with fodder.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Food for animals.
  • n. A weight by which lead and some other metals were formerly sold, in England, varying from 19 1/2 to 24 cwt (993 to 1222 kg).; a fodder.
  • n. Tracing paper.
  • n. Something which serves as inspiration or encouragement, especially for satire or humour.
  • v. To feed animals (with fodder).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A weight by which lead and some other metals were formerly sold, in England, varying from 191/2 to 24 cwt.; a fother.
  • n. That which is fed out to cattle horses, and sheep, as hay, cornstalks, vegetables, etc.
  • transitive v. To feed, as cattle, with dry food or cut grass, etc.; to furnish with hay, straw, oats, etc.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To feed with dry food or cut grass, etc.; supply with hay, straw, etc.: as, farmers fodder their cattle twice or thrice in a day.
  • To graze, as cattle.
  • n. Food for cattle, horses, and sheep, as hay, straw, and other kinds of vegetables. The word is usually confined to food that grows above ground and is fed in bulk.
  • n. Synonyms See feed, n.
  • n. A variant of fother.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. give fodder (to domesticated animals)
  • n. coarse food (especially for livestock) composed of entire plants or the leaves and stalks of a cereal crop
  • n. soldiers who are regarded as expendable in the face of artillery fire

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old English fōdor; see pā- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Old English fōdor, from Proto-Germanic *fōdran (compare Dutch voer 'pasture, fodder', German Futter 'feed', Swedish foder), from *fōda 'food', from Proto-Indo-European *pat- 'to feed'. More at food. (Wiktionary)

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