Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A light auxiliary rail vehicle (train) or tram.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An early form of the velocipede, invented in 1817 by Baron Karl von Drais of Mannheim in Germany, which was propelled by the rider's striking his feet on the ground. See velocipede. Sometimes spelled draisene.

Etymologies

From the name of the Baron Karl Drais, who invented a predecessor to the bicycle. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The kindred invention of the "draisine," or dandy-horse was patented for Baron Drais of Sauerbron.

    A History of the Nineteenth Century, Year by Year Volume Two (of Three)

  • Napoleon II was "emperor" of France for only two weeks after his fathers 100 day restoration, and that as we all know was in the summer of 1815, three years before the first draisine or velocipede, which I am fairly certain were never used for any sort of organized racing events.

    This Also Just In: Celebrity Citing!

  • In the first-known draisine race in 1819, a German cyclist named Semmler covered the 10-kilometer 6.2 mile course in 31½ minutes - an average speed under 12 mph.

    Wired Top Stories

  • The French called it a draisine, the English a hobby horse.

    Wired Top Stories

  • • French draisine maker Ernest Michaux put pedals on the front wheel in 1861, then added brakes a few years later.

    Wired Top Stories

  • This particular type of draisine is propelled by two motorcycles, one in each direction, assembled to form a makeshift freight car.

    we make money not art

  • [...] draisine running through it. this exhibition runs until 10 january 2010. i highly recommend it. polski blog, art [...]

    Robert Kusmirowski's Bunker @ The Barbican | the POLSKI blog

Comments

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  • The earliest kind of bicycle, named after its inventor, Baron von Drais of Sauerbrun. (He called it a swiftwalker; others called it a dandy-horse)

    July 9, 2008